Join us March 13, 2018, at 3:00 p.m. Eastern for an interactive webinar for updates on a special crop sequencing study in Saskatchewan.
Published in Webinars
A seed treatment is a vital and effective product, so long as it stays on the seeds where it can do its work. When it is released into the surrounding environment, however, it can cause significant political and environmental concern.
Published in Seed Treatment
Weed management is always an important topic to producers. Weeds evolve and change year to year: What plagued fields last year may be completely di erent from what growers will see in their fields this year. Decisions on what to spray can become overwhelming. That’s why we’ve continued to make updates to our Weed Control Guide for 2018. We’ve laid out the products available to you (at the time of publication) in alphabetical order, followed by tank-mix partners.
According to Peter Sikkema, professor of field crop weed management at University of Guelph’s Ridgetown Campus, glyphosate-resistant Canada fleabane was first found in eight fields in Ontario’s Essex County in 2010.
Published in Weeds
With the introduction of Monsanto’s glyphosate- and dicamba-resistant soybean into the Canadian market in 2017, producers may be wondering if there is any benefit to tank-mixing the two herbicides for weed control.
Published in Herbicides
Weed management – a top priority for producers – seems to become more complex year after year. At times, the decisions may seem overwhelming: which products should be applied when and in what combinations? To aid you in your decision-making, Top Crop Manager is pleased to bring you our annual Weed Control Guide for corn, soybeans and cereals.
Dr. Peter Sikkema and Dr. Darren Robinson, weed scientists at the University of Guelph, will be hosting an intensive course on herbicide activity (mode-of-action, selectivity, efficacy, crop injury) and weed identification in London, Ont., this coming fall. 
Published in Weeds
Weed control in corn and soybeans will only get more complicated and costly.

That was a key message by long-time Iowa State University weed scientist Mike Owen in his 2018 weed management update presentation at the Integrated Crop Management Conference in November. He noted the management practices used by many farmers are leading to more resistance to herbicides, and he doesn’t foresee an end to that anytime soon. For the full story, CLICK HERE

Join Top Crop Manager Feb. 27 and 28 in Saskatoon, Sask., for the 2018 Herbicide Resistance Summit - Register now!
Published in Herbicides
The Government of Canada is investing in science and innovation to help meet increasing global food demand, grow exports for Canadian farmers and producers, and create good paying jobs that help grow Canada's middle-class.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Minister, Lawrence MacAulay, joined newly hired researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's Harrington Research Farm to announce the completion of a $6.8-million upgrade of the world-class facility.
The Government of Canada is commitment to discovery science and innovation, and to reaching its goal of growing agri-food exports to $75 billion by 2025.

The upgrades included $2.97 million for 10 new and renovated laboratories and the purchase of a $1.3-million nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer for the Charlottetown Research and Development Centre, and $2.54 million for an expansion of the Harrington Research Farm greenhouse. The spectrometer allows scientists to study farm soil at the molecular level, which will help farmers improve the soil health and productivity of their land.

Three of the five scientists hired by the research centre over the past 18 months occupy new positions that expand the facility's areas of research. The five specialists are a microbial ecologist, an agro-ecosystem modeler and data scientist, a weed specialist, an environmental chemist and a cereals and oilseeds biologist.

"Having farmed on PEI and travelled around the world as Canada's Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, I see how science and innovation opens markets and creates new opportunities for our farmers and ranchers. This government is committed to innovation through world-class science and to helping farmers have access to the most current tools and knowledge to continue to grow the best food in the world," said MacAulay.
Published in Corporate News
Vast amounts of data are being collected on Canada's farms through the advent of precision agriculture technology and the Internet of Things (IOT).

Many types of tools, equipment and devices gather data on everything from crop yields to how many steps an animal takes in a day. However, much of that data is underutilized because it's collected by systems that don't or can't communicate with each other.

The need for better decision-making on farms through better data use resulted in Ontario Precision Agri-Food (OPAF), a partnership of agricultural organizations led by Ontario Agri-Food Technologies (OAFT) that's developing an open agri-food innovation platform to connect and share data.

The goal, according to lead director Dr. Karen Hand of Precision Strategic Solutions, is getting data, wherever it exists (both data repositories in industry or government and data generated by countless sensors) so it can be used to help advance important food production issues like food safety, traceability and plant and animal disease surveillance.

For example, information about the prevalence and control of insect pests like cutworms that damage soybean crops lies with many different people and organizations, including university and government researchers, crop advisors, input suppliers and farmers.

"There is no single spot where all of the information about a particular pest can be accessed in a robust, science-based system and used in decision-making and that's where OPAF's platform will help," Hand says.

Pilot projects are underway with Ontario's grain, dairy and poultry producers to identify their needs in areas like crop protection, sustainability and food safety and how OPAF can provide data-driven solutions to benefit farmers.

"We sit down with farmers, advisors, associations, government and researchers to find out what data they have, where they exist and if we were able to connect them, what value or benefit that would offer participants - either specific to the commodity they are producing or on larger food-related issues such as food safety or impact on trade," she explains.

And OPAF's efforts are gaining global recognition. Earlier this year, Internet of Food and Farm 2020, a large project in the European Union exploring the potential of IOT technologies of European food and farming, recognized OPAF as one of three global projects to collaborate with.

"This is going to be changing the face of data enablement in Canada and contributing globally," says Tyler Whale of Ontario Agri-Food Technologies (OAFT). "We are creating a platform that is the base of something new, and although we are piloting this in Ontario, it will be available nationwide to those who want to use it."

OPAF partners include OAFT, University of Guelph, University of Waterloo, Niagara College, Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, Livestock Research Innovation Corporation, Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, Grain Farmers of Ontario, Ontario Federation of Agriculture, Farm Credit Canada, Ontario Agri-Business Association, Bioindustrial Innovation Canada, and Golden Horseshoe Farm and Food Alliance.

This project was funded by Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative. The Agricultural Adaptation Council assists with GF2 delivery in Ontario.
Published in Precision Ag
High performance, consistency and convenience are three increasingly important attributes to Western Canadian farmers as they manage more acres with the same or fewer resources. In 2018, Arylex Active herbicides will not only make life easier for farmers at spray time, the benefits can last year round with the Go4Arylex Contest.

Dow AgroSciences Arylex active herbicides: Pixxaro, Paradigm, Cirpreme XC and Rexade are changing the way farmers think about spraying their crops. Arylex active is a new, powerful Group 4 active that enables farmers to ‘just go’ so they can spray when they want, in the conditions they’ve got.

“These products were designed to deliver excellent weed control regardless of timing - controlling a wide range of small or large weeds with the crop safety to allow flexible crop staging,” explains Kelly Bennett, category leader, west crops herbicides, Dow AgroSciences Canada. “They also have the ability to move in the plant and be effective during stressful or less than ideal climatic conditions. This means Arylex active works anytime during the season on the farmer's schedule, not just Mother Nature's, simplifying the herbicide decision and adding efficiency to get spraying done sooner. It's really worry-free broadleaf weed control."

The Arylex active Just GO benefits add up to even more, with the formal announcement of the ‘Go4Arylex Giveaway’ contest. This fall, four lucky farmers will each win one of the following pieces of high performing John Deere farm equipment, designed to make the everyday tasks on the farm easier.
  •  John Deere ZTrak™ Zero-Turn Mower
  •  John Deere Gator™ Utility Vehicle
  •  John Deere Sub-Compact Utility Tractor
  •  John Deere Compact Utility Tractor
Farmers are invited to register online starting January 8th, 2018 and accumulate entries throughout the course of the year by collecting codes or purchasing the participating products. The GO4Arylex contest launches at the Western Canadian Crop Production Show and concludes October 31st.

For further details on registration, entries and prize packages, please visit www.go4arylex.com 
Published in Corporate News
A look at some of the new soybean varieties available to growers for the 2018 planting season.
Published in Soybeans
A look at some of the new corn varieties available to growers for the 2018 planting season. 
Published in Corn
Upping the seeding rate was the single most effective tool for increasing yield and suppressing weeds in flax grown under organic management, a University of Saskatchewan study shows.

Researchers Lena Syrovy, Yanben Shen and Steve Shirtliffe, studied seeding rates and mechanical weed control methods including using a inter-row cultivator, a rotary hoe plus an inter-row cultivator, and by adjusting the crop seeding rates in four levels from 250 seeds per square metre to 2,000. | READ MORE
Published in Weeds
Throughout the month of December, Top Crop Manager has been giving away 10 passes per week to the Herbicide Resistance Summit, taking place Feb. 27 and 28, 2018, in Saskatoon. All entries submitted by Dec. 22 were entered in the final grand prize draw and we are happy to announce Cyril Anderst is our 2018 Herbicide Resistance Summit grand prize winner!

Along with our grand prize winner, we would also like to congratulate the final ten winners of the Herbicide Resistance Summit Sweepstakes!

Congratulations to this week’s lucky winners:
  • Haider Abbas
  • Raymond Howling
  • JP Pettyjohn
  • Hardy Entz
  • Jerry Banbury
  • Kevin Edmundd
  • Bill Gilmour
  • Karen Skarberg
  • Normand Boulet
  • Jason Claeys

The Summit – which is approved for 5 CCA-CEUs and 7.5 CCSC-CEUs – will give you the opportunity to hear directly from leading researchers on key issues surrounding the challenges herbicide resistance poses to agricultural productivity in Canada.

The 2018 Herbicide Resistance Summit Sweepstakes has now concluded. Thank-you for your interest and participation!

For more information, on the upcoming summit, visit https://www.weedsummit.ca/

Published in Corporate News
Few agricultural technologies capture people’s imaginations as much as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), more commonly known as drones. Since the first day a UAV looked down on a crop field, farmers have dreamed up a million ways that a bird’s eye view and remote access could improve agricultural operations.
Published in Precision Ag
Canadian lentil growers now have another tool in the fight against yield-robbing weeds. Focus herbicide has received registration for use in front of lentils for broad spectrum grass and broadleaf weed control, in addition to the current label on spring and winter wheat, corn and soybeans.

"This is a great addition to our Focus label," explains Paul Allen, product manager for FMC Canada. "Lentil growers are eager to have new actives as an option to address their weed concerns. FMC is excited to bring solutions to these growers which will enable them to maximize their lentil yield."

Focus has demonstrated high levels of activity on several species of weeds increasing in presence across the Prairies, including foxtail(s), downy brome and Japanese brome. Focus enhances resistance management with a novel Group 15 mode of action that provides residual activity on a broad spectrum of grassy and broadleaf weeds as well as a Group 14 herbicide that, when tank mixed with glyphosate, speeds up and assists in the burn-off of emerged broadleaf weeds. Focus is available as a liquid formulation offering ease of application and low use rates.

For more information on FMC Canada crop protection products, visit www.FMCcrop.ca.
Published in Pulses
The highest recorded corn yield is 532 bushels per acre set by David Hula at Charles City, Virginia in 2015 in an annual contest conducted by the National Corn Growers Association in the United States. By comparison, the highest yield in 2016 in Manitoba Corn Growers Association’s annual yield contest was 274 bushels per acre (bu/ac) set by the Baker Colony at MacGregor, Man. Both impressive yields indeed, given growing conditions at those locations. But how can new corn growers reach those yields?
Published in Corn
Top Crop Manager is pleased to present the 2018 Herbicide Resistance Summit, and we’re giving away 40 free passes during the month of December!

Enter our Summit Sweepstakes for a chance to win a free pass to the Herbicide Resistance Summit, to be held Feb. 27 and 28 in Saskatoon, Sask. Your ticket gets you access to the entire conference, including lunch, all networking breaks and happy hour on the 27th, plus breakfast on the 28th – a $120 value!

We’re giving away 10 passes per week, and you can enter once per day. Each week’s winners will be determined on Friday by 4 p.m. (EDT). Winners will be notified via e-mail the following Monday before 5 p.m. Be sure to enter every week by December 22, 2017 for your chance to win the grand prize of two free passes and a one-night stay at the Holiday Inn Saskatoon Downtown on Feb. 27! The grand prize winner will be announced December 28.

The Summit, which has been approved for 5 CCA-CEUs and 7.5 CCSC-CEUs, will give you the opportunity to hear directly from leading researchers on key issues faced by farmers, agronomists and crop protection researchers in meeting the challenges herbicide resistance poses to agricultural productivity in Canada. You’ll walk away armed with knowledge of specific actions to help minimize the devastating impact of herbicide resistance.

Enter now for your chance to win starting! Visit, https://www.weedsummit.ca/event/giveaway 
We hope to see you Feb. 27 and 28 in Saskatoon!
Published in Corporate News
With full global export approval, 2017 was a major breakthrough year for Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybean acreage in Canada. Approximately 700,000 acres were grown in Canada with about 250,000 acres grown in the West, mostly in Manitoba.
Published in Soybeans
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