Weeds

In an effort to shine a light on the current status of herbicide resistance in Canada, Top Crop Manager (TCM) has launched the Herbicide Use Survey!

As an industry leader providing up-to-date information and research, TCM is looking to gather input from producers across the country in order to develop a more thorough understanding of the state of herbicide resistance in Canada.

TCM’s Herbicide Use Survey will offer participants the ability to help tell the story of these important crop protection tools by having farmers like you share how herbicides are being used.

The survey takes less than 10 minutes to complete, and will ask details like soil and farm acreage, types of weeds being targeted, as well as management practices. All submissions will remain anonymous.

Those who complete the survey will be entered into a random draw for a $500 visa card! Complete the survey here.

The Herbicide Use Survey ends December 8th. Results will be collected and presented at the 2018 Herbicide Resistance Summit in Saskatoon, Sask., on February 27 and 28.
Don't forget to Sign up for the TCM E-Newsletter to stay informed. 

Published in Corporate News
When learning from agronomists and farmers about their experience with managing glyphosate resistant Canada fleabane, there is consensus that multiple strategies are needed and that simply tank-mixing another mode of action will not be a good long-term approach. Since 2016 we have evaluated different management tactics for Canada fleabane. READ MORE
Published in Weeds
The Climate Corporation, a subsidiary of Monsanto Company, recently announced at the Farms.com Precision Agriculture Conference, the launch of the Climate FieldView digital agriculture platform into Western Canada for the 2018 growing season.

With Climate’s analytics-based digital tools, more Canadian farmers will be able to harness their data in one connected platform to identify and more efficiently manage variability in their fields, tailoring crop inputs to optimize yield and maximize their return on every acre.

In September 2016, the company first announced the introduction of the Climate FieldView platform in Eastern Canada, where hundreds of farmers across nearly one million acres have been experiencing the value of data-driven, digital tools on their operations.

Now, farmers in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta will have the ability to use the Climate FieldView platform to uncover personalized field insights to support the many crucial decisions they make each season to enhance crop productivity.

“The Climate FieldView platform is a one-stop shop for simple field data management, helping Canadian farmers get the most out of every acre,” said Denise Hockaday, Canada business lead for The Climate Corporation. “Through the delivery of the platform’s powerful data analytics and customized field insights, farmers across Canada have the power to tailor their agronomic practices more precisely than ever before, fine tuning their action plans for the best outcome at the end of the season.”

Over the past year, the Climate FieldView platform had a strong testing effort across many farm operations in Western Canada, enabling the Climate team to further develop the platform’s compatibility with all types of farm equipment and crops, including canola and wheat, to collect and analyze field data from multiple sources.

“Part of the challenge with data is managing all of the numbers and having an adequate cloud system to store and effectively analyze the information,” said farmer D’Arcy Hilgartner of Alberta, who participated in testing the Climate FieldView platform on his operation this season. “The Climate FieldView platform instantly transfers the field data gathered from my farm equipment into my Climate FieldView account, which is especially useful during harvest season because I’m able to see where various crop inputs were used and analyze the corresponding yield. I’ve really enjoyed having this digital platform at my disposal, and I’m excited to see the positive impacts on my business this coming year.”

As Climate continues to expand its digital technologies to help more farmers access advanced agronomic insights, additional new data layers will feed the company’s unmatched R&D engine, ultimately enabling the development of valuable new features for farmers in the Climate FieldView platform.

In August 2017, the company announced the acceleration of R&D advancements through the company’s robust innovation pipeline, along with new product features and enhancements to help farmers manage their field variability more precisely than ever before.

Launched in 2015, the Climate FieldView platform is on more than 120 million acres with more than 100,000 users across the United States, Canada and Brazil. It has quickly become the most broadly connected platform in the industry and continues to expand into new global regions.

Climate FieldView Platform Offering in Western Canada

  • Data Connectivity - Farmers can collect, store and visualize their field data in one easy-to-use digital platform through the Climate FieldView Drive, a device that easily streams field data directly into the Climate FieldView platform. FieldView Drive works with many tractors and combines across Canada, in addition to anhydrous applicators and air seeders, helping farmers easily collect field data for the agronomic inputs they manage throughout the season. Recently, The Climate Corporation announced a new data connectivity agreement with AGCO, providing more farmers even more options to connect their equipment to the Climate FieldView platform. In addition to the FieldView Drive, farmers can connect their field data to their Climate FieldView account through Precision Planting LLC's monitors, cloud-to-cloud connection with other agricultural software systems such as the John Deere Operations Center, and through manual file upload.
  • Yield Analysis Tools - With Climate’s seed performance and analysis tools, farmers can see what worked and what didn’t at the field level or by field zone, and apply those insights to better understand field variability by quickly and easily comparing digital field maps side-by-side. Farmers can save regions of their fields in a yield-by-region report and can also save and record a field region report through enhanced drawing and note taking tools, retrieving the report at a later date for easy analysis on any portion of their field to better understand how their crops are performing.
  • Advanced Field Health Imagery - Through frequent and consistent, high-quality satellite imagery, farmers can instantly visualize and analyze crop performance, helping them identify issues early, prioritize scouting and take action early to protect yield. Climate's proprietary imagery process provides consistent imagery quality and frequency by using high-resolution imagery with vegetative data from multiple images, in addition to advanced cloud identification. Farmers can also drop geo-located scouting pins on field health images and navigate back to those spots for a closer look, or share with agronomic partners.
  • Seeding and Fertility Scripting - Farmers can manage their inputs to optimize yield in every part of their field with manual variable rate seed and fertility scripting tools. Through Climate’s manual seed scripting tools, farmers can easily create detailed planting plans for their fields to build a hybrid specific prescription tailored to their unique goals, saving time and improving productivity. Additionally, Climate offers a manual fertility scripting tool, enabling farmers the ability to optimize their inputs with a customized management plan for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and lime tailored to their unique goals.

2018 Availability and Pricing

The Climate FieldView platform is currently available for purchase in Western Canada on a per-acre basis so that farmers can begin using it on their farms in time for the 2018 growing season. To experience the complete value of the platform throughout the entire growing season, farmers should sign up for a Climate FieldView account by Jan. 1, 2018. For more information about the Climate FieldView platform and pricing, contact Climate Support at 1.888.924.7475 or visit www.climatefieldview.ca.
Published in Precision Ag
Many farmers have witnessed the value in applying herbicides in the fall to perennial weeds, especially perennial sow-thistle and dandelion. Often they will see a reduction in their population the next year as well as a delay in their shoot emergence. This allows the planted crop to have a competitive advantage over those perennial weeds. Unfortunately weather conditions around the time of application can be quite variable and can influence a herbicide’s effectiveness.

Click here to read more and for three top tips to make the most of this application window.
Published in Weeds
Invasive plant species can pose a serious problem for farmers. The lack of native competitors or predator species often allows invaders to spread virtually unchecked, so a minor challenge can quickly become a major problem facing farmers across a large area. With a lot of time, effort and resources, the spread of some invasive plants can be checked and in some instances, the plants can be entirely eradicated from an area.
Published in Weeds
A scientist from Agriculture Canada and an engineer from the University of PEI are teaming up on a project they hope will revolutionize how farmers deal with weeds in their fields. Their idea is to mount a camera and sensors on a sprayer.

It then uses software to identify what's a plant and what's a weed and turn the sprayer on and off to target the weeds. This summer's work was the start of a five-year project, researchers are hoping to do field-scale demonstrations by year three. READ MORE
Published in Sprayers
The World Health Organization’s cancer agency dismissed and edited findings from a draft of its review of the weedkiller glyphosate that were at odds with its final conclusion that the chemical probably causes cancer.

Documents seen by Reuters show how a draft of a key section of the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s (IARC) assessment of glyphosate - a report that has prompted international disputes and multi-million-dollar lawsuits - underwent significant changes and deletions before the report was finalised and made public. For the full story, click here
Published in Seed/Chemical
A team of University of Guelph researchers at the cutting edge of discovering how plants communicate with one another has proven the stress of “seeing” weed competition causes a plant to significantly change growth patterns and drop yield.  
Published in Weeds
Corn and soybean growers in Canada have a new tool in the fight against tough and resistant weeds. ZIDUA™ SC is a new Group 15 herbicide from BASF that contains the active ingredient pyroxasulfone.

"BASF focuses on providing Canadian growers with tools that support current and emerging resistance challenges," said Deven Esqueda, Crop Manager, Corn and Soybeans for BASF. "ZIDUA SC, backed by ten years of research, allows growers to add residual Group 15 activity to their weed management strategy and become less reliant on glyphosate."

Recently registered by the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, ZIDUA SC herbicide will be available for use in the 2018 season. ZIDUA SC is currently labelled for use in herbicide-tolerant soybeans and field corn.

ZIDUA SC is a stand-alone solution and can also be tank-mixed with glyphosate, ERAGON®LQ, MARKSMAN® or ENGENIA™ in Eastern Canada, and HEAT® LQ, ENGENIA™ or ARMEZON® in Western Canada, to provide multiple modes of action for resistance management.

Resistance has been increasing across Canada in pigweed species, including waterhemp and redroot pigweed. A study by the Canadian Journal of Plant Science states glyphosate-resistant waterhemp was first identified in Ontario in 2014. In Alberta, Group 2-resistant redroot pigweed was identied by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in 2010.

The residual Group 15 activity in ZIDUA SC helps to inhibit early root and shoot growth in these tough to control weeds, maximizing corn and soybean yield through the critical period for weed control. ZIDUA SC also provides flushing control of barnyard grass, crabgrass, green and yellow foxtail, common waterhemp and redroot pigweed.

For more information on ZIDUA SC herbicide, contact AgSolutions® Customer Care at 1-877-371-BASF (2273), or visit agsolutions.ca. Always read and follow label directions.
Published in Herbicides
The U.S. environmental agency is considering banning sprayings of the agricultural herbicide dicamba after a set deadline next year, according to state officials advising the agency on its response to crop damage linked to the weed killer.

Setting a cut-off date, possibly sometime in the first half of 2018, would aim to protect plants vulnerable to dicamba, after growers across the U.S. farm belt reported the chemical drifted from where it was sprayed this summer, damaging millions of acres of soybeans and other crops.

A ban could hurt sales by Monsanto Co (MON.N) and DuPont which sell dicamba weed killers and soybean seeds with Monsanto’s dicamba-tolerant Xtend trait. BASF (BASFn.DE) also sells a dicamba herbicide.

It is not yet known how damage attributed to the herbicides, used on Xtend soybeans and cotton, will affect yields of soybeans unable to withstand dicamba because the crops have not been harvested.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) discussed a deadline for next year’s sprayings on a call with state officials last month that addressed steps the agency could take to prevent a repeat of the damage, four participants on the call told Reuters.

It was the latest of at least three conference calls the EPA has held with state regulators and experts since late July dedicated to dicamba-related crop damage and the first to focus on how to respond to the problem, participants said.

A cut-off date for usage in spring or early summer could protect vulnerable plants by only allowing farmers to spray fields before soybeans emerge from the ground, according to weed and pesticide specialists.

Monsanto spokeswoman Christi Dixon told Reuters on Aug. 23, the day of the last EPA call, that the agency had not indicated it planned to prohibit sprayings of dicamba herbicides on soybeans that had emerged. That action “would not be warranted,” she said.

The EPA had no immediate comment.

EPA officials on the last call made clear that it would be unacceptable to see the same extent of crop damage again next year, according to Andrew Thostenson, a pesticide specialist for North Dakota State University who participated in the call.

They said “there needed to be some significant changes for the use rules if we’re going to maintain it in 2018,” he said about dicamba usage.

State regulators and university specialists from Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Iowa and North Dakota are pressuring the EPA to decide soon on rules guiding usage because farmers will make planting decisions for next spring over the next several months.

Tighter usage limits could discourage cash-strapped growers from buying Monsanto’s more expensive dicamba-resistant Xtend soybean seeds. Dicamba-tolerant soybeans cost about $64 a bag, compared with about $28 a bag for Monsanto’s Roundup Ready soybeans and about $50 a bag for soybeans resistant to Bayer’s Liberty herbicide.

Already, a task force in Arkansas has advised the state to bar dicamba sprayings after April 15 next year, which would prevent most farmers there from using dicamba on Xtend soybeans after they emerge.

Arkansas previously blocked sales of Monsanto’s dicamba herbicide, XtendiMax with VaporGrip, in the state.

“If the EPA imposed a April 15 cut-off date for dicamba spraying, that would be catastrophic for Xtend - it invalidates the entire point of planting it,” said Jonas Oxgaard, analyst for investment management firm Bernstein.

Monsanto has projected its Xtend crop system would return a $5 to $10 premium per acre over soybeans with glyphosate resistance alone, creating a $400-$800 million opportunity for the company once the seeds are planted on an expected 80 million acres in the United States, according to Oxgaard.

By 2019, Monsanto predicts U.S. farmers will plant Xtend soybeans on 55 million acres, or more than 60 percent of the total planted this year. READ MORE 
Published in Herbicides
In a study featured in the most recent edition of Weed Science, a team of researchers tilled four fields every two weeks during the growing season. They then monitored each site to quantify the density and species of seedlings that emerged from the weed seed bank six weeks after each till. They found that total weed density tended to be greatest when soil was tilled early in the growing season. More than 50 percent fewer weeds emerged after late-season tillage. | READ MORE
Published in Weeds
In 2013, two University of Guelph weed scientists began collaborating on alternatives to herbicides for weed control. The report, by Francois Tardif and Mike Cowbrough, was released in 2016.
Published in Weeds
Hard to identify and distinguish from one another, the annual grasses compete with winter wheat and fall rye because their growth habits are similar. Downy brome (Bromus tectorum) densities of 50 to 100 plants per square metre that emerge within three weeks of the crop can reduce winter wheat yields by 30 to 40 per cent. Both downy brome and Japanese brome (Bromus japonicas) are classified as noxious weeds in Alberta.  
Published in Weeds
Japanese brome (Bromus japonicas) exists as a winter annual or summer annual grass weed in the Canadian Prairies.
Published in Weeds
Every farmer has to deal with weed control. With the introduction of new weeds compounded by the growing issue of herbicide resistance, choosing effective herbicides has become a daunting task. Savvy Farmer, Canada’s foremost on-line authority on crop protection, has released two free new apps that every farmer who deals with weed control should have on their smartphone or tablet.

Savvy Weed ID & Control is a weed identification app that not only includes an industry-leading 300+ Canadian weeds, but also identifies every herbicide brand in Canada that will control each weed in any crop. What sets it in a class of its own though is its real-time link to the Savvy Farmer pest control database, allowing the app to instantly search through over 1,500 pesticide brands to identify every brand can control that mystery weed in any of the over 900 crops grown in Canada.

The second app is Savvy Resistance Manager. This app identifies all herbicide brands will control herbicide resistant weeds, even those with multiple resistance, in any crop. In Canada, over 40 weed species are now herbicide resistant to one, or in many cases, several different herbicide modes of action. More disturbing though is that herbicide resistance is growing in severity every year. Savvy Resistance Manager is fast and easy to use – in just 4 steps the app will generate a list of all herbicide brands that are registered to control your resistant weed in any one of 900 crops, and using the application method you prefer.

Download both apps today by searching for “Savvy Weed” or “Savvy Resistance” in either the App Store (Apple) or Play Store (Android)
Published in Corporate News

Research trials in the U.S., and more recently at the University of Saskatchewan, are proving what’s old is new again. In this case, the use of “old” herbicides such as Avadex, Fortress and Edge are making a comeback of sorts in a weed management system that’s been dubbed “herbicide layering.”

Published in Herbicides
Winter Wheat
The winter wheat crop continues to grow well. The cool temperatures have slowed growth a little. The frost on the mornings of May 8 and 9 appear to have had little impact on the crop other than some minor damage to leaf tips. Fortunately, the wheat was not in head. Some fields in the Niagara and Haldimand regions still require a nitrogen application but will have to wait until the fields are fit. A number of fields with split applications of nitrogen still require the second application as well. Red clover under seeded in the wheat is doing well as there has been adequate moisture for germination and early growth. At this point in time there is marginal benefit to applying herbicides to the wheat crop. Winter annuals have already impacted the crop and most perennial weeds (sow thistle) are not fully emerged. Late planted fields that are thinner may still benefit from a herbicide application.

Septoria leaf spot and powdery mildew continue to be the most common diseases present in the lower canopy. Wheat streak mosaic virus was confirmed in Huron County. With the rapid growth of the crop and favourable weather conditions, it is important to continue scouting to determine if fungal disease infection is progressing up the plant (especially on susceptible varieties) and is critical to determine if a fungicide application is needed and at what timing (flag leaf/T2 or flowering/T3).

Stripe rust was also found in one field in Oxford County as well as another in Stoney Point (Essex County). As mentioned last week, there are large differences in variety susceptibility to stripe rust and fields planted with susceptible varieties should be scouted and targeted first. Trace amounts of stripe rust was detected when the field was sprayed on May 3, 2017. In a week, the disease went from less than 1 per cent to 100 per cent incidence and 30-60 per cent severity where a fungicide was not applied. Fields planted to tolerant or resistant varieties need to be regularly assessed from now until heading to assess stripe rust risk. Remember strobilurin based fungicides should not be applied on wheat from the boot stage and later.

Spring cereals
Spring cereal acreage will likely be lower this year as it has been difficult to get the crop planted. If it is still desired to plant a spring cereal for feed a good option would be oats or adding peas to the oat crop to increase crude protein. Spring cereals that are planted have sprouted but not yet emerged.

Corn
The number of corn acres in the ground has changed very little in the last week as significant rainfall occurred across the province May 4 to 6. Much of the province received about 50mm (2 inches) with some areas receiving more and others less than that. In most areas the fields are draining well. Fields with less than adequate drainage or fields with poor crop rotations and lots of tillage are draining more slowly. A few days after the rain fertilizer spreaders, sprayers and some planters were getting back on the sandier soils. As planting is further delayed the temptation will be to plant in less than ideal conditions. Keep in mind what happened last year when corn was planted wet and the rain stopped. Roots couldn’t penetrate the side wall compaction and the slot opened up exposing the seed. The ideal corn planting depth is 1.5” to 2” (3.5 to 5 cm).

Chickweed and other prostrate plants are attractive for egg laying by black cutworm moths arriving on winds blowing up from the US. Trapping networks in the U.S. and Ontario are reporting a higher and earlier than normal black cutworm flight this spring. Preventative measures include delaying planting by two to three weeks after a burn down which causes the young cutworm larvae to starve, prior to the crop emerging. Prolonged wet weather like this year, reduces the chance for these preventative measures to be put in place. Take note of those fields planted shortly after burn down and plan to scout for leaf feeding and cutting injury every three to four days, once the crop emerges until it is safely past the V4 stage.

Armyworm moths are being caught in traps earlier and more abundant this year. Scouting cereals, mixed forages and emerging corn fields will need to take priority in the last two weeks of May.

Canola
A small percentage of the canola crop has been planted due to wet field conditions. Early planting of the crop is recommended to avoid Swede Midge infestations. Early planting may be a challenge this year. Ideally the crop should be planted by May 20th. Crop insurance planting deadlines range from May 31 to June 10 depending on location.

Forage and Pasture
Hay and pasture growth has been good due to adequate moisture conditions. Excess moisture has made it difficult to get livestock on the pastures and some are pulling livestock off as it is no longer fit.
Published in Corporate News
Health Canada has published the final re-evaluation decision on glyphosate. Following a rigorous science-based assessment, Health Canada has determined that when used according to the label, products containing glyphosate are not a concern to human health and the environment.

Based on this re-evaluation, Health Canada will continue the registration of products that contain glyphosate, but will require updates to product labels. By April 2019, manufacturers will be required to ensure that all commercial labels on pesticides containing glyphosate include the following:

·      A statement indicating that re-entry into the sprayed areas should be restricted to 12 hours after application in agricultural areas where glyphosate products were used.

·      A statement indicating that the product is to be applied only when the potential to spread to areas of human activity, such as houses, cottages, schools and recreational areas, is minimal.

·      Instructions for spray buffer zones to protect non-targeted areas and aquatic habitats from unintended exposure.

·      Precautionary statements to reduce the potential for runoff of glyphosate into aquatic areas.

Health Canada will continue monitoring research on potential impacts of glyphosate products to ensure the safety and security of Canadians and the environment. The department also says they are committed to working closely with its international counterparts on evidence-based approaches to pesticide regulations.

Don't forget, the Pesticide Label Search App can help you find the latest detailed instructions, first aid statements and warnings on the label.
Published in Corporate News
There are three opportunities to manage weeds with herbicides in order to achieve a successful soybean crop.  

1. Pre-seed or pre-emergent burndown: both ensure the crop is off to a clean start. An effective strategy is tank-mixing glyphosate with a pre-seed or pre-emergent burndown of a Group 14 herbicide to provide early season weed control and can target weeds that cannot be controlled in-crop. Using multiple modes of action can also delay glyphosate resistance and manage existing Group 2- and glyphosate-resistant weeds.

2. In-season herbicide application: this manages weeds that may have emerged later.

3. Pre-harvest application: improves crop uniformity, harvestability and perennial weed control.

Research by University of Guelph weed scientist Dr. Clarence Swanton shows that soybean plants can sense the presence of weeds in the soil, and will change their physiology and growth patterns if they detect above-ground weed competition.

Swanton and his team are conducting ongoing research to determine whether these cellular-level changes impact yield, or if the plant can repair itself or compensate for any injury.

In earlier research, Swanton’s team also determined that the critical weed- free period for soybeans is from the first to the third-trifoliate leaf stage, and weeds that emerge with or after the soybean crop have an impact on yield.

Bryce Geisel, technical marketing specialist for herbicides at BASF Canada, says it’s important to choose products that use a different mode of action than the burndown. “This can control a wider spectrum of weeds and help delay herbicide resistance,” he says. “Doing a pre-seed application can help growers properly time an in-crop application, and ensures that weeds are more manageable for that second pass.”
Published in Corporate News
The late harvest in fall 2016 created more than just delays in crop removal – fields were dirty with weed growth and there was limited time for fall herbicide application. As a result, many farmers are expecting weedier fields this spring and will need to be diligent in using the best weed control strategies including pre-seed herbicides and the best in-crop solutions.

To assist farmers in what will likely be a more challenging spring battle with weeds, Dow AgroSciences has announced that the Diamond Rewards herbicide offer that was previously only available to Nexera customers will be open to all growers seeding any Roundup Ready and Clearfield canola varieties this spring.

Effectively immediately, with a minimum purchase of 240 acres (6 cases) of Eclipse, any Roundup Ready canola grower can qualify for the $2.00 per acre rebate. Similarly, with a minimum purchase of 240 acres (6 cases) of Salute, any Clearfield canola grower can qualify for the $2.00 per acre rebate.

Nexera canola growers will continue to receive the rebate with no minimum purchase requirement. Farmers must be registered for the Dow AgroSciences Diamond Rewards program and purchases must be made between December 1, 2016 and November 30, 2017 to qualify.

Click for more information on Eclipse and Salute.  
Published in Herbicides
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