Success in Agriculture
The New Holland T6.175 Dynamic Command tractor was crowned Machine of the Year 2018 in the Mid Class Tractor category at the Agritechnica trade show in Hanover, Germany.

The machine received the coveted award for its technical innovation and the benefits it brings to customers, with selection criteria focusing on innovative features, performance, productivity, cost of operation, ease of use and operator comfort.

“This award is testament to New Holland’s long-standing leadership of the mixed farming and dairy segment. It is a well-deserved recognition of the hard work and dedication of all those involved in the development of the T6.175 Dynamic Command tractor, who worked tirelessly to produce a tractor that meets the specific requests of our customers,” said Carlo Lambro, President of New Holland Agriculture Brand.

In August 2017, New Holland announced it is expanding its acclaimed T6 Series offering with the new T6 Dynamic Command option. These new T6.145, T6.155, T6.165 and T6.175 are the only tractors in the segment featuring a 24x24 semi powershift transmission on the market. They are versatile tractors that will be an asset to the fleets of dairy, livestock, and hay and forage operations.

For more information, visit: http://www.newholland.com/na
Published in Tractors
The Canadian Grain Commission has launched a weekly statistical report on the allocation of producer cars. The publication of these statistics enhances the transparency of commercial grain handlings and supports the marketing of Canadian grain. The report is available on both the Canadian Grain Commission's web site and the Government of Canada's Open Data site and will be updated weekly.

Each week's publication reflects the cumulative number of producer cars allocated from the start of the crop year to the end of the shipping week. Reports within the publication break down the allocation numbers by the type of grain shipped, province of origin, and the grain's destination.

By making data such as this available publicly, the Canadian Grain Commission is supporting the Government of Canada's commitment to making data open and available to all Canadians.

Previously, statistics about producer railway cars were only available via email. They were distributed for free, but only went to a small number of stakeholders. Not all stakeholders were aware they could receive these reports, which didn't align with the Government of Canada's policy on open data.

The Canadian Grain Commission will now be publishing producer railway car statistics online to align with the Government of Canada's open data policy and to make these statistics available to all stakeholders.

Because the Canadian Grain Commission is publishing its producer railway car statistics online in more accessible formats, users will be able to compile the data to meet their specific needs.

Rather than using the categories wheat, durum, oats, barley, rye, flaxseed, canola and other to display grain movement by grain type, the new online content doesn't use an "other" category. Instead, statistics are displayed by grain type, even if the number of railway cars shipping that grain type is relatively low.

Also, the destination category now includes producer railway cars going into the licensed Canadian system (terminal and process elevators by region); the unlicensed Canadian system (by western or eastern region; processors; container facilities; seed or feed facilities); United States; and Mexico.

The online statistical reports include:
  • Glossary
  • Summary – cumulative and weekly totals by grain type and cumulative totals by country and grain
  • Cumulative by province and by grain
  • Cumulative by destination

History of producer railway car statistics
Producer railway car statistics have been published since the 1910 to 1911 crop year. Each year, producer railway car statistics (referred to back then as platform loadings) appeared in the Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce Part V Statistics.

In the 1942 to 1943 crop year, the Canadian Grain Commission began publishing weekly producer railway car statistics as part of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada Visible Supply of Canadian Grain report. Eventually, this report became Grain Statistics Weekly which is published weekly online.

The Canadian Grain Commission prepares 3 railway car statistical reports: weekly, monthly and annual. The weekly report is one page and includes cumulative data by type of grain and a weekly summary of the number of railway cars by port. The monthly report and the annual report are made up of 5 tables of producer railway car shipments as follows: by grain; by province and grain; by train run; by train run and grain; and by destination.
Published in Corporate News
Despite being at opposite ends of the planet, Canada and Australia have long been soul sisters, But it’s in agriculture where the similarities come to the fore, with very similar commodity profiles, particularly for grain, dairy and protein.

And despite very different target markets, trade agreements and government attitudes, each country’s agricultural communities are after one thing — a profitable and expanding appetite for their produce. | READ MORE
Published in World Outlook
Eric Kaiser has spent a lifetime transforming 14 former Loyalist settlement properties into a large, productive egg and field crop farm business – and always with a singular focus on the environment and innovative, sustainable soil conservation practices.

His efforts have earned him the 2017 Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) Soil Champion Award, which is handed out annually to recognize leaders in sustainable soil management.

“There is no one practice that defines conservation farming, it’s a management system and every component has a part to play,” says Kaiser, who has a civil engineering degree from the Royal Military College. “Sustainability has many components, but the preservation of top soil must be the final result.”

Kaiser bought his first 300 acres in 1969; today, the now-1,300 acre Kaiser Lake Farms is owned by his youngest son Max. It’s on the shores of the Bay of Quinte and Hay Bay recreational area that is also the drinking water source for the Kaisers and their non-farming neighbors.

The farm’s heavy soils don’t drain water well naturally, so Kaiser has spent decades minimizing soil erosion by installing diversion berms, dams and surface inlets to control surface water and direct it into the underground tile system. Using a map he keeps track of all the agronomic information he’s gathered on the farm since 1986, including soil tests, and pH, organic matter and phosphorous levels.

“We’re egg farmers so we have manure to spread, which comes with big soil compaction concerns if we travel on fields with heavy equipment,” Kaiser says, adding that’s why he built laneways and grass waterways throughout the farm long before this became a recommended Best Management Practice.

Kaiser farmed conventionally until the mid-1980s, which meant regularly working the soil, but became an early Ontario adopter of no-till production to reduce erosion risk and maintain soil health – seeding his crops directly into the stubble of last year’s plants without plowing the soil.

He has also experimented with many different cover crop varieties for more than 30 years, ultimately settling on a few that do well on their land, like barley, sorghum, tillage radish, oats, peas and sunflowers. Cover crops improve soil health by boosting its organic matter and nitrogen levels.

Constant change, too, is part of Kaiser’s approach to farming; for example, there’s not a single piece of equipment on the farm that hasn’t been modified and improved somehow to be better suited to the unique needs of their land.

“We never do the same thing every year, but we do the things we think are important for this farm,” says Kaiser. “We hope to keep this place sustainable in the future; we need to be more productive so we need to be more sustainable.”
Published in Corporate News
Real-time DNA sequencing, anywhere, anytime, is one step closer to making the jump from science fiction to science fact, according to researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. A recent paper published in Scientific Reports outlined how the team used a MinION portable DNA sequencer to analyze plant species in the field.
Published in Genetics/Traits
A new Montana State University-developed spring wheat that's already attracting attention because of its potential for excellent yields and superior bread-making qualities is making its way through the pipeline toward Montana growers.

Lanning has higher grain protein and stronger gluten than Vida, the most widely grown spring wheat in Montana from 2010 to 2015. It is a hollow-stemmed wheat and has a grain yield that's equivalent to Vida, according to the Journal of Plant Registrations. READ MORE 
Published in Plant Breeding
On Oct. 9 - 13, 100 young agricultural enthusiasts, aged 18-25 and from 49 different countries, gathered in Brussels, Belgium, for the third edition of the Youth Ag-Summit.

Organized by Bayer, together with the two Belgian young farmers associations Groene Kring and Fédération des Jeunes Agriculteurs, the event provided an opportunity for delegates to work on concrete solutions to one of humanity's greatest challenges: How to feed a growing world population in a sustainable manner.

At the Youth-Ag Summit, delegates, including four from Canada, worked throughout the week in groups of 10 to develop their ideas, before pitching to a jury of experts and the audience. The jury and the audience then selected the winners on the basis of criteria such as feasibility, innovativeness and creativity:
  • Third place went to "Imperfect Picks", a group who was assigned to work on SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production. These delegates impressed with their cartoon campaign to promote "ugly fruits" to children, and enable a broader cultural shift towards accepting food that appears blemished but is still of good quality. They won €3,000 to further develop and implement their project.
  • Second place went to "Seeds of Change", a group of delegates focusing on SDG 4: Quality Education. They will use their prize of €5,000 to fund a project aimed at promoting agriculture in schools through young agricultural champions, in order to bridge the disconnect between people who consume, and people who produce food.
  • Finally, first place was awarded to the group "AGRIKUA" ("kua" being the Swahili word for "grow"), whose project focuses on promoting Gender Equality (SDG 5) in the agricultural sector. Their plan to create an online professional platform for young Kenyan women seeking opportunities in agriculture impressed the jury and audience alike, and they took home the grand prize of €10,000. On top of this funding, the AGRIKUA delegates will also receive dedicated training and coaching to help make the project a reality. They will also be invited back to Europe to present their project to a relevant industry platform.
Cassie Hayward from Halifax, Nova Scotia, was one of four Canadian delegates to attend the Summit. She was part of the winning AGRIKUA team and feels that this experience has been life-changing.

"I'm very fortunate to have been part of such an amazing team. The outcome we achieved is because of the collaboration and commitment of our group to make a real impact in addressing food security," said Hayward. "Within 24 hours our lives changed. Since my teammates and I arrived at home, various groups have expressed their interest in our project."

Hayward wasn't the only Canadian to garner attention at the Youth Ag-Summit. In fact, all of the top teams had representation from Canada—the only country in attendance to do so.

"We are extremely proud of our Canadian delegates," said Al Driver, president and CEO, Bayer Crop Science. "These four delegates used their diverse experience and backgrounds to find tangible solutions to addressing food security. They should all be proud in the manner they represented their country to the world."

Speaking about this year's crop of winners, Fleur Wilkins, Head of strategic messaging and executive communications for Bayer Crop Science and member of the jury, said, "We were blown away by the level of creativity, intelligence, and diligence shown by each of the delegate groups in the final projects they presented. Bayer is thrilled to be funding three of these for future development, but we are convinced that all of this year's Youth Ag-Summit delegates will continue to champion and contribute to a more sustainable food system."

As well as working in groups to develop their projects, delegates spent the week hearing from world-renowned speakers and partner organisations, who inspired them to each commit to doing "Three Little Things" in their everyday life to foster greater food security.

They also paid a visit to the EU Committee of the Regions, and met with Members of the EU Parliament Tom Vandenkendelaere and Richard Ashworth to discuss agricultural policy. Another highlight of the week was a visit to Hof ten Bosch, a Bayer ForwardFarm nestled in the heart of the Belgian countryside.

Visit www.youthagsummit.com to meet the delegates and to learn more about the Summit.
Published in Corporate News
Birds, butterflies and especially bees have found a welcoming home at Antony John's farm near Guelph, Ontario, named "Soiled Reputation". John's dedication to biodiversity and creating habitats for pollinators can be seen in every aspect of his farm, and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA), the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association (CFGA) and Pollinator Partnership are happy to announce that he is the winner of the 2017 Canadian Farmer-Rancher Pollinator Conservation Award.

The award recognizes the contributions of Canadian farmers in protecting and creating environments where pollinators can thrive.

John has also been active in spreading awareness of pollinator health and encouraging practices to support biodiversity. He hosts both private and public farm tours, and also hosted a television show on the FoodTV channel for several years. In addition to carrots and leeks, his fields and greenhouses yield at least 50 different organic vegetables used primarily for gourmet salad mixes. The farm supplies produce to restaurants, markets and homes, both locally and in the Greater Toronto Area.

It is difficult to single out a single project that earned the award for John, as the entire Soiled Reputation farm is based around one main crop, which he would tell you is "biodiversity". Aspects of the farm that help attract pollinators include:
  • Huge flower gardens and plantings interspersed through crops to provide pollen and nectar
  • 30-foot buffer strips seeded with legumes that are allowed to flower around a 40-acre field
  • A two-acre meadow that is home to over 20 beehives
"Pollinators are an essential component to any farming ecosystem," said CFA president Ron Bonnett. "The innovation that Antony John has shown is an inspiration for many growers looking to enhance pollinator habitats. His projects are incredible examples of how farmers can work to both improve their business and their land's biodiversity."

Over $2 billion of Canadian produce sold annually is reliant on pollinators, including staples like apples, berries, squash, melons and much more. These species are integral to the continued health of both the environment and agriculture sector, and Canadian farmers like Antony John are integral to ensuring that our environment will be healthy for generations to come.
Published in Corporate News
New Holland Agriculture was awarded the silver medal by the independent expert committee appointed by the DLG German Agricultural Society for its pro-active and automatic combine setting system – the first in the industry – for its CR Revelation combines.

“This innovative feature addresses one of the biggest challenges for combine operators: maintaining maximum throughput levels while keeping losses and the percentage of damaged grain at low levels. The new automatic combine setting system takes automation to a new level: while current systems are reactive, New Holland’s solution proactively predicts changes in slope and crop density, making corrective adjustments before overload or losses even occur,” said Lars Skjoldager Sørensen, head of harvesting product line.

Maximum throughput, minimum losses and damaged grain, less operator fatigue

Once past yields, field topography and all combine settings based on GPS positioning data are programmed into the combine, during the first pass of the following harvest campaign, the system will interpolate the data and the setting system will respond rapidly to varying conditions.

The proactive system relies on traditional sensors and control systems that have been supplemented by industry first cleaning shoe load sensing, Field and Yield prediction, and remote rotor vanes.

The operator can choose different operation modes ranging from maximum throughput to maximum grain quality – always optimizing power efficiency. Using the data stored into the system, the combine will optimize its settings by itself – and before the header actually starts cutting and taking in the crop.

Industry first cleaning shoe pressure sensors prevent grain losses before they occur

The new pressure sensors on the cleaning system introduce a new way of measuring the load of the cleaning shoe. New Holland’s innovative system measures the difference in pressure across the upper sieve, which gives a very precise indication of the cleaning shoe load. Based on this data, the system proactively maximises cleaning shoe performance and prevents losses.

If losses do occur, the system is able to immediately identify the cause and make the necessary corrections very fast.

This translates into faster and smaller corrections to the sieve opening and fan speed, resulting in the cleaning shoe performing at higher capacity level in a stable way. This in turn enables the operator to increase productivity – with the added advantage of not having to continuously make manual adjustments, significantly reducing fatigue.

Self-learning Field and Yield Prediction proactively optimises settings for conditions ahead

New Holland’s new automation system takes a proactive approach to correcting settings according to changing harvest conditions. The Field and Yield Prediction system is a self-learning tool that predicts changes in slope and crop density in front of the combine.

It uses topology data to anticipate conditions ahead of the header. In order to predict the yield ahead of the combine, it extrapolates the yield of the adjacent passes already harvested and the GPS Yield Mapping data of previous passes programmed into the combine. The automation system proactively optimises the settings accordingly.

This results in more reliable and smoother actions that improves the combine’s overall performance and output without any intervention from the driver, further reducing operator fatigue.

Automatic rotor vane adjustment improves power efficiency and reduces losses

The combine automatically changes the angle of all the rotor vanes according to the crop load, which has a direct impact on the time the crop remains in the rotors and the rotor’s power requirements. This means that the automated system is able to improve the rotor’s power efficiency without impacting the threshing and separation settings improving fuel savings and performance.The combine adapts automatically to changing crop conditions or between different crop types, increasing daily productivity and reducing the time required for conversion between crops. This new feature reduces the power consumed in the rotors up to 20 per cent.

“We are very proud of this award, which is testament to New Holland’s commitment to harnessing technology and innovation to help its customers in their constant drive for efficiency and productivity,” commented Alessandro Maritano, Vice President EMEA, New Holland Agriculture. “We have developed a self-learning and proactive system that acts faster, optimizing and stabilizing the combine process while reducing the need for operator intervention. With this automation system we are taking another step forward in the automation of the complete combine harvest process. This innovative feature contributes to the exceptional performance of the recently launched CR Revelation, the world’s most powerful, high capacity combine: with a redesigned residue management system, improved adjustable crop flow, and further power upgrade, it delivers up 10 per cent more capacity while guaranteeing grain quality and outstanding residue management.”
Published in Corporate News
Fundamental research into the chemistry of flax by University of Saskatchewan plant scientist Martin Reaney has led to a new patented technology and an unexpected byproduct — a flax-based artist quality oil that does not cause yellowing over time, dries quickly, and has significantly reduced odour.

A start-up company, Prairie Tide Chemicals Inc. (PTC), has spun off from Reaney’s research, and now Saskatoon firm Hues Art Supply is making, bottling and selling the latest product — flaxseed oil for artists’ paint derived from Saskatchewan-grown flax plants. For the full story, click here

Related: Flax and hemp may have use for construction
Published in Corporate News
Australian researchers at the University of Adelaide have identified a naturally occurring wheat gene that, when turned off, eliminates self-pollination but still allows cross-pollination - opening the way for breeding high-yielding hybrid wheats.

Published in the journal Nature Communications, and in collaboration with U.S.-based plant genetics company DuPont Pioneer, the researchers say this discovery and the associated breeding technology have the potential to radically change the way wheat is bred in Australia and internationally. To read the full story, click here.
Published in Genetics/Traits
A local company focused on robotic cutting solutions is experimenting with an ultra-high pressure no-till system. A-Cubed (Advanced Agriculture Applications) is using fluid jets in place of coulters on standard, commercially available seeding equipment they’ve modified.

The goal, according to Agricultural Business Development Manager Jeff Martel, is for farmers using no-till (planting without tilling the soil) to cut cleanly through heavy residues and cover crops using water – either on its own or potentially supplemented with inputs like lime or fertilizer, for example.

Leading development of the technology has been the South Australia No-Till Farmers Association (SANTFA) – and a connection between SANTFA and Martel brought the idea to Canada, where Martel’s employer I-Cubed Industry Innovators is now launching A-Cubed to move the technology forward.

Initial plot trials by the company last year produced intriguing results. Fluid jet-planted corn had a 20 per cent higher yield by weight than the same corn planted conventionally in the next rows. And each fluid jet-planted soybean plant held more pods than the conventionally planted soybeans and had significantly bigger and longer root systems. Germination time was a day sooner on average for the fluid jet-planted plants too.

This year, employees Matt Popper and Will Whitwell, who are also both farmers, modified a six-row John Deer planter with the technology and used that planter to successfully plant corn into hay and soybeans into corn stubble.

“The more we know, the more we don’t know and the more we need to find out about the agronomics, the chemistry, etc.,” said Martel. “What if we want to use fertilizer instead of water? We know we can inject liquid and granular fertilizer, but how do we know it’s beneficial, how do we monitor and measure?”

According to Martel, the planter and pump are available to Ontario farmers or researchers interested in working with A-Cubed to investigate some of these questions, and he’s been reaching out to North American agronomists to showcase some of their early results and seek advice. Research on the technology is underway in Australia and in China, too.

The company’s immediate goal is to develop a small liquid jet no-till system designed for research purposes that could “open the door in a thousand directions for research.” He also envisions a retrofit kit for farmers to use on existing equipment, as well as a commercially available planter equipped with water jets.

The technology could be most beneficial in moderate to high rainfall areas where the ground underneath the cover is softer and it’s harder to cut through residue.

“This doesn’t care whether it’s wet or dry. You don’t have to wait for dew to dry off, you can plant around the clock,” Popper said, adding that because the technology is cutting so cleanly into the ground, another benefit could be a reduction in tractor horsepower needed.
Published in Seeding/Planting
A former potato chip plant is creating new market opportunities and lucrative new crops for the farmers of Prince Edward Island.

Earlier this year, New Leaf Essentials East took over facilities in Slemon Park previously used by Small Fry and Humpty Dumpty to produce potato chips. Now the plant specializes in processing "pulses" – high-protein legume plants like dried peas, beans, lentils, and chickpeas.

They are used in pulse products including starches, proteins, fiber and flour for human and pet food markets, including aquaculture feed. The company also serves export markets worldwide. To read the full story, click here.
Published in Corporate News
In celebration of Canada and Ontario’s 150th anniversary and to recognize the history and diversity of Ontario’s agri-food sector, OMAFRA is offering complimentary commemorative signs to families, farming communities, and properties that have been linked to agricultural production for the past 150 years.

You many apply or nominate someone by October 31, 2017. There is no supporting documentation required. Simply provide a description about your farming activities and commodities associated with it, the scale of farming operations, and your contact information.

To apply or nominate, visit: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/rural/ontario150.htm

Published in Corporate News
Scientists from the International Barley Hub have discovered a genetic pathway to improved barley grain size and uniformity, a finding which may help breeders develop future varieties suited to the needs of growers and distillers.

Cereal genetics researchers working with professor Robbie Waugh and Dr. Sarah McKim, at the James Hutton Institute and the University of Dundee’s Division of Plant Sciences, published work examining the genetic control of grain formation in barley, specifically the role of a gene called VRS3. Researchers found that a mutation in this gene improved grain uniformity in six-rowed barley. To read the full story, click here.
Published in Genetics/Traits
With four available jobs for every agriculture graduate today there has never been a better time for students from both rural and urban locations across the country to consider an education in agriculture or an agriculture/food-related field.

That's just the path 65 students who have earned $1,500 Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarships are starting down as they enter their first year of agriculture or food-related studies at Canadian universities and colleges this fall. Unique to the winners' list this year is a student who grew up on an Alpaca farm in the Yukon.

"Farming in the isolated north has its own unique set of challenges where the winters are brutally long, the climate is unforgivingly dry and the cost of supplies ridiculously high," wrote Kataya Ulrich from Northern Spirit Alpaca Farm located just outside the city limits of Whitehorse, Yukon. "But global warming is beginning to alter the realities of our harsh climate. Our winters are not as cold and we are experiencing more moisture and a longer growing season. The agricultural economy is growing and with the right focus, I think it has the potential for great success."

Traditionally the Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarship Program required applicants to be from a farm and entering agriculture or an agricultural-related field of study. In honour of the program's 25th anniversary last year, and the recognition of the close connection between farming and food, eligibility for the Opportunity Scholarship Program was extended to students pursuing studies in food-related fields of study, regardless of whether they grew up on a farm or not.

"Our program has always been about supporting young people in their pursuit of a diploma or degree in agriculture because we need the very best to consider agriculture as a career path so our industry can continue to grow and prosper," said Trish Jordan, director of public and industry affairs with Monsanto Canada. "Our decision to open up the program to students interested in a food-related career was driven by a desire to close the gap between farming and food. It also acknowledges that agriculture truly is all about food."

Thousands of deserving Canadian students have received a total of more than $1.9 million since the scholarship program launched using corporate funds in 1991. Transition to the Monsanto Fund in 2012 has enabled more students to win scholarships due to consistent funding for the program.

All applications were reviewed by an independent judging panel comprised of: Robert Adamson, consultant and program director with Pembina Trails School Division; Johanne Ross, Executive Director of Agriculture in the Classroom-Canada.; JoAnne Buth, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian International Grains Institute; Crystal Jorgenson, Communications Specialist with the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences at the University of Manitoba; Ellen Pruden, Education and Promotion Manager for the Manitoba Canola Growers Association; and Brigitte Burgoyne, Communications Manager, Richardson International.

Administered on behalf of the Monsanto Fund by Agriculture in the Classroom-Manitoba Inc. (AITC-M), the scholarship program received 156 applications from across Canada this year.

"We are thrilled to serve as the independent administrator of the Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarship Program," said Sue Clayton, executive director of AITC-M. "Our organization is focused on connecting students to agriculture, exposing them to the role agriculture plays in their lives and opening their eyes to the many opportunities available to build a career in agriculture. It's rewarding for us to see so many students wanting to explore education and careers in agriculture."

Details on the launch of the 2018 Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarship Program will be released in February 2018 and will also be available online at www.monsanto.ca
Published in Corporate News
Farmers Edge™, a global leader in decision agriculture, announced today a strategic partnership to bring Planet’s best-in-class global monitoring data and platform capabilities to the Farmers Edge precision agriculture product suite.

Planet is an integrated aerospace and data platform company that operates the world’s largest fleet of earth imaging satellites, collecting the largest quantity of earth imagery. Farmers Edge is now a sole distributor for Planet in key agricultural regions, with the right to use and distribute high-resolution, high-frequency imagery from Planet’s three flagship satellite constellations.

Through this multimillion-dollar, multi-year global distribution agreement, Farmers Edge and Planet are significantly expanding their existing partnership. The companies will deliver the vanguard of remote sensing driven and analytics-based agronomy services to growers worldwide.

Farmers Edge customers will be among the first to take advantage of field-centric, consistent, and accurate insights from satellite imagery. While traditional imagery products provide only a partial, delayed, or inconsistent view of fields, this partnership equips Farmers Edge growers with comprehensive, high-quality field imagery more frequently updated than any other company in the industry.

“Until now, the challenge with satellite imagery was the data was simply not frequent enough to react to crop stress in a timely manner,” said Wade Barnes, President and CEO of Farmers Edge. “At Farmers Edge, providing our customers with the most concise, comprehensive, and consistent data is at the core of what we do. We understand the need for more image frequency, that’s why we are partnering with Planet. Daily imagery is a game-changer in the digital ag space.”

The combination of Planet’s unprecedented data set and Farmers Edge state-of-the-art image processing technology allows for early crop monitoring and gives growers the best opportunity to correct factors that could limit crop performance and compromise yield potential.

Growers will now have a wealth of field-centric data updated throughout the growing season, including early monitoring of crop stand, detection of pest and weed pressure, drainage issues, hail damage, herbicide injuries, nutrient deficiencies, yield prediction and more.

“Farmers Edge is consistently at the cutting edge of innovation in agricultural technology, and we’re proud to expand our partnership with them as we work to improve profitability, sustainability, and efficiency for the world’s producers,” said Will Marshall, CEO of Planet. “The challenges faced by the agriculture industry are complex in nature and global in scale, and we believe our data is uniquely positioned to solve agricultural challenges.”

“Retailers, co-ops, equipment dealers, agronomists, and all other important advisors to the farmer can now partner with Farmers Edge and leverage this industry changing capability within their business,” said Ron Osborne, Chief Strategy Officer of Farmers Edge. “We're pleased to be able to help so many in our industry manage risks, in near real-time. This is great for our customers, our partners, and agriculture.”

In 2016, Planet awarded Farmers Edge its Agriculture Award, recognizing the company’s pioneering work with ag-based analytics, Variable Rate Technology and field-centric data management.
Published in Corporate News
Not many farmers can say they’ve had a hand in early-stage selection of the very crops they’re growing in their fields, but the University of Manitoba’s Participatory Plant Breeding Program is making this possible for producers coast-to-coast.
Published in Plant Breeding
It’s been almost 15 years since the Human Genome Project was declared complete. The publicly funded research project was established in 1990, kicking off an international effort to identify and map all of the DNA sequences in the human genome by 2005.
Published in Genetics/Traits
BMO Bank of Montreal and the Ontario Plowmen's Association honoured eleven farm families at the annual BMO Ontario Farm Family Awards during the International Plowing Match and Rural Expo in Walton, Ontario held Saturday, September 23, 2017.

The BMO Ontario Farm Family Awards recognize the outstanding contributions made by farmers across the province by bringing the community together to celebrate both these exceptional families and the vital urban-rural relationship. The families will be treated to a day of Plowing Match events, a plaque presentation, luncheon and family photograph session.

2017 BMO Ontario Farm Family Award Recipients:

Crovalley Holsteins
Cull Farms
Flynn Farms Ltd.
Gamblane Farms Ltd.
Jennen Family Farm
Orangeline Farms
Maitland Meadows Farms
Jobo Farms
Orserdale Farms
Roy-A-Lea Farms
Sunlane Farms

"BMO has been a steadfast supporter of the Canadian agricultural community throughout our 200 years of doing business, and this event recognizes the Ontario families that lead the sector in business and environmental best practices," said Julie Barker-Merz, Senior Vice President, South Western Ontario Division, BMO Bank of Montreal. "We're thrilled to honour the leadership of these families in the agriculture sector and their vital support of the Ontario economy."

BMO has been a supporter of the International Plowing Match and Rural Expo since 2007. The sponsorship has since evolved with BMO as a Presenting Partner through to 2021 inclusive. As part of the partnership, BMO introduced the inaugural Ontario Farm Family Awards. Recognizing farm families is a further demonstration of BMO's commitment to agriculture. BMO also recognizes farm families in southern Alberta annually at the Calgary Stampede.
Published in Corporate News
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