Specialty Research
The Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC) annouced more than $2.6 million in funding for 22 cutting edge wheat research projects aimed at improved farm profitability through variety development, pathology, agronomy and pre-breeding.
Published in Corporate News
The Government of Canada will invest $3.7 million to the Eastern Canada Oilseeds Development Alliance (ECODA), announced federal Minister of Agriculture Lawrence MacAulay at the Atlantic Soy processing plant in Belle River, Prince Edward Island.
Published in Business & Policy
An Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researcher has identified a gene that will be key in breeding new soybean cultivars with resistance to Phytophthora sojae, which annually causes up to $50 million in losses in Canada and between $1 billion and $2 billion in losses globally.
Published in Plant Breeding
Malt barley production offers both opportunities and challenges in the Maritimes. Agronomic research, varietal testing and educational activities are underway to help growers capture the opportunities and meet the challenges.
Published in Cereals
Being the only flax breeder in Western Canada puts the onus on Helen Booker to target traits that are of keen interest to flax growers, processors and users. Her program is working on a wide range of advances – from stronger disease resistance, greater adaptation to northern conditions, and increased yields, to larger seeds, yellow seed coats and higher alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) levels in the oil.
Published in Plant Breeding
Canola contributes around $26.7 billion annually to the Canadian economy, according to figures from the Canola Council of Canada. However, most of its value lies in the oil, while canola meal has traditionally been considered a byproduct suitable only for animal feed.
Published in Canola
The fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, which causes stem rot, is a major economic disease in canola that impacts the crop across all of Canada’s growing regions.
Published in Diseases
Winter wheat has major environmental benefits. It helps reduce wind and water based soil erosion, out competes many weeds, and generally conserves energy because of the fewer field operations.
Published in Plant Breeding
The Pest Management Centre is inviting submissions for its 2018 Pest Management Research Report (PMRR), an annual resource on integrated pest management of insect pests and plant diseases significant to the agri-food industry in Canada.
Published in Corporate News
Since the early 1970s, canaryseed has become established as an alternative cereal crop for Saskatchewan farmers. The province produces approximately 90 per cent of the canaryseed grown in Canada and about 65 per cent of the global supply of the crop, which is used to feed wild and caged birds the world over. Now, canaryseed was recently approved for human food use in Canada and the U.S., offering the potential for new opportunities for Saskatchewan producers.
Published in Cereals
For bread lovers, there is nothing quite as delightful as a mouthful of soft, fresh bread – and nothing quite as disappointing as hard, stale bread. Now a new stay-fresh wheat line developed in Saskatchewan offers several extra days of that wonderful fresh-baked quality.
Published in Genetics/Traits
The deadline to submit a letter of intent for the Canola Agronomic Research Program (CARP) is end of day, Tuesday, September 4, 2018. 
Published in Corporate News
The journal Science published the highest quality genome sequence produced to date for the bread wheat variety Chinese Spring, which would lead to further innovation in wheat breeding and improving the crop. 
Published in Plant Breeding
A major research project called SoyaGen is tapping into the power of genomics to really boost Canadian soybean breeding advances.
Published in Plant Breeding
What if monitoring temperature controls was automated, and a grain bin itself could warn suppliers of low levels?

That's the theory behind an emerging category of technology called "the Internet of things (IOT)," and it's leading to better business outcomes for farms and food business across Canada.

Kyle Arbuckle, of Kitchener, Ontario-based blueRover, says agriculture and food is one key area of focus for the company, which serves clients across North America. | READ MORE
Published in Storage

When you think of a radish, you may think of the small, round, crunchy, red-and-white vegetable that is sliced into salads. You might be surprised to learn that a larger, longer form of this root vegetable is being used in agriculture as a cover crop.

Cover crops are grown between main crops such as wheat, corn, or soybeans when the soil would otherwise be bare. Cover crops can control erosion, build soil, and suppress weeds. Radish as a cover crop can provide these benefits and more. The long radish root creates deep channels in the soil that can make it easier for subsequent crops to reach water in the soil below.

Radish is also known to benefit water quality. It does so by taking up nitrogen, in the form of nitrates, from the soil. This leaves less nitrogen in the soil that can run off to nearby streams and lakes.

Matt Ruark of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and colleagues wanted to know more about the effect of this nitrate uptake in the following growing season. They established test sites in three Wisconsin locations and studied them for three years. At each site, some plots received the radish cover crop and some did not. The radish cover crop was planted in August after a wheat harvest. Corn was planted the following spring.

The research showed that radish significantly reduced the nitrate content in the soil as compared to the test plots with no cover crop. This finding confirmed the results of several earlier studies. It showed that radish did take up nitrogen, in the form of nitrates, from the soil.

This research supports the use of radish as a cover crop as a trap crop for fall nitrogen. However, what happens to that nitrogen afterward remains unknown.

There was no consistent evidence that nitrogen was returned to the soil as the radish crop decomposed. Radish did not supply nitrogen to the corn crop. The researchers concluded that in the Upper Midwest the nitrogen in radish could not replace fertilizer.

Ruark commented, “Radish grows well when planted in late summer and traps a lot of nitrogen. But the way it decomposes doesn’t result in a nitrogen fertilizer benefit to the next crop. We don’t know exactly why. We were hoping it would provide a nitrogen benefit, but alas, it did not.”

What happens to the nitrogen? The decomposition pattern of radish needs to be explored more fully to learn more. And perhaps, Ruark said, radish could be more beneficial if mixed with a winter-hardy cover crop. 

Read more about Ruark’s work in Agronomy Journal.
Published in Other Crops

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada scientist Louis-Pierre Comeau is sifting his way through New Brunswick soil in search of answers to one of the biggest issues facing local farmers: the loss of soil organic matter and the decrease of soil health in farm fields.

Published in Soil
Reducing natural habitats in order to create more acres of farmland may become a regretful practice with negative consequences – including reducing the yield potential of canola and other oilseeds, says Melanie Dubois, research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) from the Brandon, Man., Research and Development Centre. Dubois recently finished her second field season of a three-year project.
Published in Canola
Aphanomyces disease in peas and lentils is a widespread and serious problem across Western Canada. In 2017, even with dry conditions in many areas, the disease remained a significant problem in peas, with crop and yield losses in infected fields remaining high. In lentils, the incidence and severity was reduced under the drier conditions, however the inoculum is still likely present. Currently the only control option in fields with Aphanomyces is extended rotations away from peas and lentils for at least six to eight years.  
Published in Diseases
A team of researchers led by University of Guelph plant scientist and professor, Karl Peter Pauls, recently completed a three-year research project to tackle one of Ontario’s most costly bean diseases: anthracnose.
Published in Diseases
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