Protection
The Ontario Ministry of Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) is conducting its annual survey sampling grower corn fields to determine ear mould incidence and the occurence of mycotoxins in grain. 
Published in Diseases
The Pest Management Centre is inviting submissions for its 2018 Pest Management Research Report (PMRR), an annual resource on integrated pest management of insect pests and plant diseases significant to the agri-food industry in Canada.
Published in Corporate News
Cereal grains and other major food crops can become contaminated with mycotoxins, which are naturally occurring toxins produced by mold that grow in certain conditions. Some of the mycotoxins familiar to the grains industry include Ochratoxin A, Deoxynivalenol (DON) and others, which are not only regulatory and international trade concerns, but also potential health issues. Mycotoxins can develop at various crop stages, pre-harvest, harvest and in storage, but cannot be detected visually and have no taste or smell.
Published in Imports/Exports
Manitoba Agriculture shares farm safety reminders in an effort to reduce the number of accidents during harvest season. 
Published in Harvesting
Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease affecting yield and quality of wheat and other important cereal crops across Canada. Breeding for resistance continues to be a key strategy in the fight against FHB, and research scientists like George Fedak are helping to lead the way.
Published in Cereals
As growers know, FHB fungi can produce toxins that limit the grain’s use for food and feed. The grain’s concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON), the most common FHB toxin, is the critical limiting factor for most buyers.
Published in Diseases
According to David Lobb, best management practices for soil health might actually have a negative impact on water quality, because any extra phosphorus stored in residue on the soil surface can potentially move into waterways in runoff events.
Published in Soil
Too hot. Too cold. Stressed. Hail damage. Often, these and other factors are cited when referring to a canola yield response to boron (B) application. Research over the years tends to indicate that a yield response to boron is unlikely under most circumstances. Still, around 20 per cent of canola growers include a boron treatment in their fertility program.  
Published in Canola
A research scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in P.E.I is investigating natural ways to deal with pests that damage cabbage, canola and potatoes. 
Published in Insect Pests
Unregulated genetically modified (GM) and herbicide-resistant wheat has been found growing near an isolated access road in southern Alberta, according to a statement by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).
Published in Genetics/Traits
How much do you know about scouting in the weeks right after seeding? Test your knowledge with these five questions and learn more about the topic.
Published in Canola
First cut took place on most of the forage acres in southern Ontario. Though this is an effective way to manage alfalfa weevil, this year the larvae were quite small at the time of cutting, writes Tracey Baute in her latest Baute Bug Blog on FieldCropNews.com. | READ MORE
Published in Insect Pests
With planting delayed briefly due to rain, it is the perfect time to get out and set up some wireworm bait stations. Soil temperatures are quite warm now and recent University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus research has found that spring is the better time to successfully bait for wireworms. Tracey Baute, OMAFRA field crop entomologist, has further directions on FieldCropNews.com. | READ MORE
Published in Insect Pests
The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) in Canada has granted approval for the registration of Lumisena fungicide seed treatment.

Lumisena, from Corteva (the agriculture division of DowDuPont), provides protection against Phytophthora root rot, the leading soybean disease in North America. Lumisena moves within the plant to protect against multiple stages of the Phytophthora pathogen's life cycle through preventative, curative, eradicative and antisporulant activity. In multiyear, on-farm trials, Lumisena was shown to significantly improve soybean stands and plant health under Phytophthora pressure, according to a press release. Growers can expect Lumisena to be commercially available at 2019 planting timing.
Published in Fungicides
Specialists at Alberta Agriculture and Forestry (AF) are working to have fields predetermined for the 2018 insect survey season and are looking for assistance from agrologists and producers across Alberta.

This year, the survey teams would like to check pea and wheat fields. They will survey for pea leaf weevil in late spring and survey for wheat midge and wheat stem sawfly in the fall after harvest.

“In addition to the rest of the province, we are looking for pea fields up into the Peace Country because the pea leaf weevil has been confirmed into that area, and we want to expand our survey there,” says Scott Meers, insect management specialist with AF. “We are looking for fields that producers would be happy to have us check. For allowing us on their fields, we will provide those producers with a report of the survey results.”

Meers would also like to increase in the number of bertha army worm traps in Alberta. “We are trying to get four to five traps per county across the province. If you are interested, we will hook you up with all the materials you will need.”

For agrologists and producers who have monitored for the bertha army worm adults in the past, now is a good time to check those traps to see if they need to be repaired or replaced. “They are plastic, and plastic in the wind and sunshine tends to break down after time. Let us know if they need to be upgraded or replaced,” adds Meers.

For more information about monitoring for the upcoming growing season or replacing traps, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
Published in Insect Pests
Many fields across Ontario may be at risk of alfalfa winterkill this year. Christine O'Reilly shares how to determine whether your fields were at risk, if damage occurred, and what to consider for next steps on FieldCropNews.com. | READ MORE
Published in Other Crops
Although oats are less susceptible than other cereals to Fusarium head blight (FHB), this disease can impact oat yield and quality when conditions strongly favour the disease – as they did on the Prairies in 2016. So, researchers are working to better understand FHB in oat, to develop oat varieties with even stronger FHB resistance, and to help ensure the grain remains safe for humans and livestock.
Published in Diseases
The fungal disease Verticillium longisporum was first detected in Canada in a canola field on a farm in Manitoba in 2014. The results of a subsequent national survey led by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and released in 2016, detected the presence of the pathogen V. longisporum in varying levels in six provinces in Canada: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec.
Published in Diseases
Cabbage seedpod weevil is an invasive insect pest of canola. Originally found in Europe, the insect proliferated in the United States and was first confirmed in Alberta in the mid-1990s.
Published in Insect Pests
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has released the Cereal Aphid Manager app to help grain producers and crop advisors control cereal aphid populations in wheat, barley, oats, and rye. This smartphone app predicts what the aphid population will be in seven days and the best time to apply insecticide. “It makes you scout properly for cereal aphids, but what is really does, it allows you to record the number of aphids so you don’t have to do any math yourself,” says Tyler Wist, field crop entomologist with AAFC.

“What makes this app unique is that it works the beneficial insects as well,” adds Wist. “It works in the predators and the parasitoids that help to keep the aphid populations in check. When you’re scouting for the aphids, you’re also scouting for the natural enemies.”

The Cereal Aphid Manager is based on a model built by researchers at AAFC. The model treats the grain field as an ecosystem and takes into account many complex biological interactions including:
  • The number of different natural enemies of aphids in the field and how many aphids they eat per day.
  • The lifecycles of aphids and their enemies including their developmental stages, egg laying behaviour, population growth rate, lifespan, etc.
  • Types of non-crop habitats that insects around the field that the different insects prefer. 
By taking these factors into consideration, the app can give a more accurate and precise prediction as to whether an aphid population could significantly impact the productivity of the field.

Cereal Aphid Manager is available to download from the App Store and Google Play. For more information about this app, contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , field crop entomologist with AAFC.
Published in Cereals
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