Programs, Grants & Awards
Derek & Tannis Axten of Axten Farms Ltd- Minton, Sask., and Véronique Bouchard & François Handfield of Ferme aux petits oignons at Mont-Tremblant, Que., were chosen as National Winners from seven regional farmers at Canada’s Outstanding Young Farmer (OYF) Program’s national event held last week in Penticton, B.C.

Meeru Dhalwala, one of the three judges, commented, “In addition to judging such amazing farms as businesses, I was personally enriched by learning in greater depth how their farms work and how important so many family members of different generations are to the success of current and future farms of Canada.”

Both families assessed the challenges they face in farming and found new and innovative ways to address them, one taking over a generational farm and the other starting from scratch.

“Once again, the seven regional finalists exceeded our expectations as innovative, forward thinking, young agricultural leaders. The judging process of evaluating their applications, presentations, and interviews was not easy. The National Winners are strong role models and oozed with everything positive in their agricultural operations,” said OYF past president, Luanne Lynn.

Understanding that high inputs and timely rains were not always sustainable on a southern Saskatchewan grain farm, Axten Farms began to research their soil food web and soil biology. Their motto became “soil is our most valuable resource so how can we improve its health” and, the microscope became their best soil health tool. With cost of production and the soil’s health as their key focus, they have now incorporated intercrops (seeding one or more crops together), cover crops, controlled traffic farming (using same track for all operations), compost extract and compost teas into their operation. It is a real change in mindset for a Saskatchewan farmer.

Working with a human resource specialist, Véronique & François developed an employee guide that has helped to minimize the employee challenges that comes with their vegetable industry. They feel that enjoying your work, humour, a sense of achievement, and positive feedback all contribute to job satisfaction for their local employees. Aux petits oignons is fully organically certified, and offers weekly subscriptions for vegetable baskets as well as produce through their farm and local markets. They want to recreate the bond between urban residents and farmers while building confidence in authenticity, quality and freshness of their product.

Every year this event brings recognition to outstanding farmers in Canada between 18 and 39 years of age who have exemplified excellence in their profession while fostering better urban-rural relations. Axten’s and Bouchard/Handfield were chosen from seven regional finalists, including the following honourees from the other five regions:
  • Gary & Marie Baars - Chilliwack, B.C.
  • Marc & Hinke Therrien - Redwater, Atla.
  • Brent & Kirsty Oswald – Steinbach, Man.
  • Dusty Zamecnik- Langton, Ont.
  • Lauchie & Jolene MacEachern- Debert, N.S.
All the finalists exemplified pride, passion and professionalism in the agriculture industry.

Celebrating 37 years, Canada’s Outstanding Young Farmers’ program is an annual competition to recognize farmers that exemplify excellence in their profession and promote the tremendous contribution of agriculture. Open to participants 18 to 39 years of age, making the majority of income from on-farm sources, participants are selected from seven regions across Canada, with two national winners chosen each year. The program is sponsored nationally by CIBC, John Deere, Bayer, and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada through Growing Forward 2, a federal, provincial, territorial initiative. The national media sponsor is Annex Business Media, and the program is supported nationally by AdFarm, BDO and Farm Management Canada.
Published in Corporate News
Top Crop Manager is pleased to announce the first 10 winners of the Herbicide Resistance Summit Sweepstakes!

Throughout the month of December, we’re giving away 10 passes per week to the Herbicide Resistance Summit, to be held Feb. 27 and 28, 2018, in Saskatoon, Sask.

Congratulations to this week’s lucky winners:
  • Kelly Volsky
  • François Tardif
  • Kris Malenchak
  • Neil Beauchamp
  • Bruce Elke
  • Jeff DeHaan
  • Warren Baxter
  • Hai Ying Yuan
  • Bob Chubb
  • Vanessa Jensen
Each week’s winners are determined on Friday by 4 p.m. (EDT) Winners will be notified via e-mail the following Monday before 5 p.m.

Be sure to enter every week before Dec. 22, 2017 for your chance to win the grand prize of two free passes and a one-night stay at the Holiday Inn Saskatoon Downtown on Feb. 27! The grand prize winner will be announced Dec. 28.

Didn’t win this week? Click here to enter next week’s draw!

The Summit – which is approved for 5 CCA-CEUs and 7.5 CCSC-CEUs – will give you the opportunity to hear directly from leading researchers on key issues surrounding the challenges herbicide resistance poses to agricultural productivity in Canada.

For more information, visit https://www.weedsummit.ca/
Published in Corporate News
The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) recognizes the ExactApply Nozzle Control System from John Deere with the AE50 Award for 2018. The AE50 award highlights the year’s most innovative designs in product engineering in the food and agriculture industry, as chosen by a panel of international engineering experts.

Introduced in 2016, the ExactApply Nozzle Control system provides sprayer operators a comprehensive solution that improves the coverage and control of spray applications due to an industry-exclusive Pulse Width Modulation (30 hertz pulsing) and automatic A/B nozzle switching from the sprayer cab.

The system also offers operators turn compensation, individual nozzle on/off control, LED lights in each nozzle body for improved visibility, and smart diagnostics to improve, monitor and document sprayer applications at the nozzle.

According to Doug Felter, product marketing manager for sprayers at John Deere, ExactApply enhances existing technology that is currently in the market and combines it into one innovative product completely integrated into John Deere R-Series Sprayers and rate control systems.

“ExactApply Nozzle Control improves the operator’s ability to manage droplet size and coverage of products being applied, enhancing the accuracy and efficacy of the applied products, and helps producers reduce their input costs by reducing over application or under application in odd-shaped fields,” Felter explains. “It improves the performance of drift-reducing nozzles by controlling the flow rate and pressure through the spray tip over a wider range of field speeds and adjusts the rate by nozzle across the length of the boom during turns and curves to provide more accurate application.”

ASABE is an international scientific and educational organization dedicated to the advancement of engineering applicable to agricultural, food, and biological systems.

The awards will be presented at the ASABE Agricultural Equipment Technology Conference in Louisville, Kentucky, in February. Information on all award winners will be included in the January/February 2018 ASABE’s Resource magazine and on the ASABE website. Further information on the Society can be obtained by visiting www.asabe.org/.
Published in Corporate News
James Fletcher was a self-educated naturalist who transformed Canada's approach to economic entomology. Over several decades he was able to help Canadian farmers, fruit growers and gardeners better understand the impacts of both beneficial and harmful insects to their crops and businesses.

In early November, Catherine McKenna, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, as well as the Member of Parliament for Ottawa-Centre, commemorated the importance of James Fletcher as a person of national historic significance.

Through his extensive travels across Canada, Fletcher collected plant and insect specimens for identification and established a national network of farmers and gardeners who reported on harmful weeds and insects in their region. For the full story, click here
Published in Corporate News
The provincial government of New Brunswich is investing $500,000 in agricultural services equipment as part of the 2018-19 capital budget.

“Our staff works to support our farmers and agricultural producers,” said Agriculture, Mines and Rural Affairs Minister Andrew Harvey. “Making the right investment at the right time ensures that we will continue to be able to provide the efficient, high-quality services and support that producers rely on.”

Harvey visited the Potato Development Centre in Wicklow, where capital investments will allow for work such as replacing walls and cooling units on potato storage bins.

“This investment builds on investments announced last year to replace equipment at the Potato Development Centre,” said Harvey.

The department will also fund the purchase of veterinary field equipment and other equipment, including a new backup generator that will ensure the protection of pharmaceuticals and samples.

The funding is part of $28.1 million in spending on new initiatives identified in the capital budget. The government will invest $815.3 million in public infrastructure in 2018-19.

“Agriculture is a key sector of our economy and one that we have identified as a growth area under the Economic Growth Plan,” said Harvey. “Investments like those being made this year by the Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture and Fisheries ensure we can continue to provide farmers with the services they need and help support growth and innovation in the agricultural sector.”
Published in Corporate News
Two innovative research centres at the University of Saskatchewan will bolster their expertise in water security and agricultural technologies thanks to an investment of over $2.7 million from the Government of Canada.

The Global Institute for Water Security will receive more than $1.3 million to establish the Smart Water Systems Laboratory to deliver transformative technological capabilities for water-related observation and data collection. 

The Global Institute for Food Security will receive more than $1.3 million for the creation of the Omics and Precision Agriculture Laboratory (OPAL), which supports state-of-the-art precision agriculture using high-throughput digital phenotyping of crops integrated with genomics data and analysis expertise. For the full story, click here
Published in Corporate News
Montreal-based Inocucor Technologies Inc., one of Canada's leading agri-tech companies, has received approval for up to $7.7 million in funding from Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), an arm's-length foundation of the Government of Canada that works with Canadian companies to bring early-stage clean technologies to market. The funding will support the development of Inocucor's second product, Synergro Free.

Synergro Free is a bio-fertilizer that naturally increases yields in commodity row crops such as soybean, corn and wheat. The SDTC funding will support improvements in manufacturing efficiencies as well as production scale-up and marketing of Synergro Free to large-scale farmers in Canada and the U.S. For the full story, click here
Published in Corporate News
The New Holland T6.175 Dynamic Command tractor was crowned Machine of the Year 2018 in the Mid Class Tractor category at the Agritechnica trade show in Hanover, Germany.

The machine received the coveted award for its technical innovation and the benefits it brings to customers, with selection criteria focusing on innovative features, performance, productivity, cost of operation, ease of use and operator comfort.

“This award is testament to New Holland’s long-standing leadership of the mixed farming and dairy segment. It is a well-deserved recognition of the hard work and dedication of all those involved in the development of the T6.175 Dynamic Command tractor, who worked tirelessly to produce a tractor that meets the specific requests of our customers,” said Carlo Lambro, President of New Holland Agriculture Brand.

In August 2017, New Holland announced it is expanding its acclaimed T6 Series offering with the new T6 Dynamic Command option. These new T6.145, T6.155, T6.165 and T6.175 are the only tractors in the segment featuring a 24x24 semi powershift transmission on the market. They are versatile tractors that will be an asset to the fleets of dairy, livestock, and hay and forage operations.

For more information, visit: http://www.newholland.com/na
Published in Tractors
Eric Kaiser has spent a lifetime transforming 14 former Loyalist settlement properties into a large, productive egg and field crop farm business – and always with a singular focus on the environment and innovative, sustainable soil conservation practices.

His efforts have earned him the 2017 Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) Soil Champion Award, which is handed out annually to recognize leaders in sustainable soil management.

“There is no one practice that defines conservation farming, it’s a management system and every component has a part to play,” says Kaiser, who has a civil engineering degree from the Royal Military College. “Sustainability has many components, but the preservation of top soil must be the final result.”

Kaiser bought his first 300 acres in 1969; today, the now-1,300 acre Kaiser Lake Farms is owned by his youngest son Max. It’s on the shores of the Bay of Quinte and Hay Bay recreational area that is also the drinking water source for the Kaisers and their non-farming neighbors.

The farm’s heavy soils don’t drain water well naturally, so Kaiser has spent decades minimizing soil erosion by installing diversion berms, dams and surface inlets to control surface water and direct it into the underground tile system. Using a map he keeps track of all the agronomic information he’s gathered on the farm since 1986, including soil tests, and pH, organic matter and phosphorous levels.

“We’re egg farmers so we have manure to spread, which comes with big soil compaction concerns if we travel on fields with heavy equipment,” Kaiser says, adding that’s why he built laneways and grass waterways throughout the farm long before this became a recommended Best Management Practice.

Kaiser farmed conventionally until the mid-1980s, which meant regularly working the soil, but became an early Ontario adopter of no-till production to reduce erosion risk and maintain soil health – seeding his crops directly into the stubble of last year’s plants without plowing the soil.

He has also experimented with many different cover crop varieties for more than 30 years, ultimately settling on a few that do well on their land, like barley, sorghum, tillage radish, oats, peas and sunflowers. Cover crops improve soil health by boosting its organic matter and nitrogen levels.

Constant change, too, is part of Kaiser’s approach to farming; for example, there’s not a single piece of equipment on the farm that hasn’t been modified and improved somehow to be better suited to the unique needs of their land.

“We never do the same thing every year, but we do the things we think are important for this farm,” says Kaiser. “We hope to keep this place sustainable in the future; we need to be more productive so we need to be more sustainable.”
Published in Corporate News
On Oct. 9 - 13, 100 young agricultural enthusiasts, aged 18-25 and from 49 different countries, gathered in Brussels, Belgium, for the third edition of the Youth Ag-Summit.

Organized by Bayer, together with the two Belgian young farmers associations Groene Kring and Fédération des Jeunes Agriculteurs, the event provided an opportunity for delegates to work on concrete solutions to one of humanity's greatest challenges: How to feed a growing world population in a sustainable manner.

At the Youth-Ag Summit, delegates, including four from Canada, worked throughout the week in groups of 10 to develop their ideas, before pitching to a jury of experts and the audience. The jury and the audience then selected the winners on the basis of criteria such as feasibility, innovativeness and creativity:
  • Third place went to "Imperfect Picks", a group who was assigned to work on SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production. These delegates impressed with their cartoon campaign to promote "ugly fruits" to children, and enable a broader cultural shift towards accepting food that appears blemished but is still of good quality. They won €3,000 to further develop and implement their project.
  • Second place went to "Seeds of Change", a group of delegates focusing on SDG 4: Quality Education. They will use their prize of €5,000 to fund a project aimed at promoting agriculture in schools through young agricultural champions, in order to bridge the disconnect between people who consume, and people who produce food.
  • Finally, first place was awarded to the group "AGRIKUA" ("kua" being the Swahili word for "grow"), whose project focuses on promoting Gender Equality (SDG 5) in the agricultural sector. Their plan to create an online professional platform for young Kenyan women seeking opportunities in agriculture impressed the jury and audience alike, and they took home the grand prize of €10,000. On top of this funding, the AGRIKUA delegates will also receive dedicated training and coaching to help make the project a reality. They will also be invited back to Europe to present their project to a relevant industry platform.
Cassie Hayward from Halifax, Nova Scotia, was one of four Canadian delegates to attend the Summit. She was part of the winning AGRIKUA team and feels that this experience has been life-changing.

"I'm very fortunate to have been part of such an amazing team. The outcome we achieved is because of the collaboration and commitment of our group to make a real impact in addressing food security," said Hayward. "Within 24 hours our lives changed. Since my teammates and I arrived at home, various groups have expressed their interest in our project."

Hayward wasn't the only Canadian to garner attention at the Youth Ag-Summit. In fact, all of the top teams had representation from Canada—the only country in attendance to do so.

"We are extremely proud of our Canadian delegates," said Al Driver, president and CEO, Bayer Crop Science. "These four delegates used their diverse experience and backgrounds to find tangible solutions to addressing food security. They should all be proud in the manner they represented their country to the world."

Speaking about this year's crop of winners, Fleur Wilkins, Head of strategic messaging and executive communications for Bayer Crop Science and member of the jury, said, "We were blown away by the level of creativity, intelligence, and diligence shown by each of the delegate groups in the final projects they presented. Bayer is thrilled to be funding three of these for future development, but we are convinced that all of this year's Youth Ag-Summit delegates will continue to champion and contribute to a more sustainable food system."

As well as working in groups to develop their projects, delegates spent the week hearing from world-renowned speakers and partner organisations, who inspired them to each commit to doing "Three Little Things" in their everyday life to foster greater food security.

They also paid a visit to the EU Committee of the Regions, and met with Members of the EU Parliament Tom Vandenkendelaere and Richard Ashworth to discuss agricultural policy. Another highlight of the week was a visit to Hof ten Bosch, a Bayer ForwardFarm nestled in the heart of the Belgian countryside.

Visit www.youthagsummit.com to meet the delegates and to learn more about the Summit.
Published in Corporate News
Marijuana, hemp's narcotic cousin, is the subject of federal plans for expanded legalization.

Degree and diploma aggies interested in producing commercial cannabis and/or hemp will be able to get college-certified starting next year.

Niagara College recently announced it will launch a graduate certificate program in commercial cannabis production in 2018, a program it bills as Canada’s “first post-secondary credential” in the crop’s production.

Niagara picked up approval this summer from Ontario’s Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development to offer the one-year post-graduate program, for students who already have either a diploma or degree from an accredited college or university in agribusiness, agricultural sciences, environmental science/resource studies, horticulture or natural sciences, or an “acceptable combination of education and experience.”

The program, running through the college’s School of Environment and Horticulture, is expected to prepare graduates to work in licensed production of cannabis, whether to produce licensed marijuana for the therapeutic drug market, hemp plants for fibre or hempseed for hemp oil.

“Driven by legislative changes in Canada and abroad, there is a growing labour market need, and education will be a key component of the success of this emerging industry,” Al Unwin, the School of Environmental and Horticulture’s associate dean, said in a release.

The program, he said, “will produce graduates who are skilled and knowledgeable greenhouse and controlled environment technicians who are also trained in all of the procedures, requirements, regulations and standards for this industry.”

Topics to be covered include plant nutrition, environment, lighting, climate control, pest control, plant pathology and cultivar selection as well as regulations and business software applications.

Niagara College said the program will conform to all regulations and requirements, including a “separate and highly secure learning environment/growing facility.” It’s also expected to include a field placement with a licensed producer in its second semester.

Applicants will have to be at least 19 years old by the start of classes, and will also have to undergo a police check “at minimum” to ensure their eligibility to apply for an Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) license.

The program will run at the college’s Niagara-on-the-Lake campus, where it operates various other agribusiness programs, facilities and research projects.

Roger Ferreira, CEO of Hamilton-based Beleave, Inc., which operates licensed marijuana producer First Access Medical, hailed the college in its release for “having the vision to fill this knowledge gap,” citing “tremendous demand for knowledgeable, skilled workers in this highly technical industry.”
Published in Corporate News
OMAFRA recently released 'New Horizons: Ontario's Draft Agricultural Soil Health and Conservation Strategy' for public input.

Soil is a vital natural resource and the foundation of agricultural production. The many benefits of a healthy soil are important - underpinning the long-term sustainability of the farm operation, our agri-food sector and our environment.

What is a healthy agricultural soil? Essentially it refers to a soil's ability to support crop growth without becoming degraded or otherwise harming the environment.

While a soil can be degraded through particular practices, the good news is that many best management practices (BMPs) can build back and safeguard soil health.

The draft strategy builds on the vision, goals, objectives and concepts presented in the 2016 'Sustaining Ontario's Agricultural Soils: Towards a Shared Vision' discussion document.

It also builds on the extensive soil health efforts of agricultural organizations and OMAFRA. It was developed in collaboration with the agricultural sector, and it reflects feedback received during public engagement on the discussion document, from farmers, Indigenous participants and other interested groups and individuals.

OMAFRA would like to hear your thoughts and feedback on the draft strategy. Your input will help guide the development of a final Soil Health and Conservation Strategy for Ontario which will be released in spring 2018.

For more information, click here
Published in Soil
Birds, butterflies and especially bees have found a welcoming home at Antony John's farm near Guelph, Ontario, named "Soiled Reputation". John's dedication to biodiversity and creating habitats for pollinators can be seen in every aspect of his farm, and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA), the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association (CFGA) and Pollinator Partnership are happy to announce that he is the winner of the 2017 Canadian Farmer-Rancher Pollinator Conservation Award.

The award recognizes the contributions of Canadian farmers in protecting and creating environments where pollinators can thrive.

John has also been active in spreading awareness of pollinator health and encouraging practices to support biodiversity. He hosts both private and public farm tours, and also hosted a television show on the FoodTV channel for several years. In addition to carrots and leeks, his fields and greenhouses yield at least 50 different organic vegetables used primarily for gourmet salad mixes. The farm supplies produce to restaurants, markets and homes, both locally and in the Greater Toronto Area.

It is difficult to single out a single project that earned the award for John, as the entire Soiled Reputation farm is based around one main crop, which he would tell you is "biodiversity". Aspects of the farm that help attract pollinators include:
  • Huge flower gardens and plantings interspersed through crops to provide pollen and nectar
  • 30-foot buffer strips seeded with legumes that are allowed to flower around a 40-acre field
  • A two-acre meadow that is home to over 20 beehives
"Pollinators are an essential component to any farming ecosystem," said CFA president Ron Bonnett. "The innovation that Antony John has shown is an inspiration for many growers looking to enhance pollinator habitats. His projects are incredible examples of how farmers can work to both improve their business and their land's biodiversity."

Over $2 billion of Canadian produce sold annually is reliant on pollinators, including staples like apples, berries, squash, melons and much more. These species are integral to the continued health of both the environment and agriculture sector, and Canadian farmers like Antony John are integral to ensuring that our environment will be healthy for generations to come.
Published in Corporate News
New Holland Agriculture was awarded the silver medal by the independent expert committee appointed by the DLG German Agricultural Society for its pro-active and automatic combine setting system – the first in the industry – for its CR Revelation combines.

“This innovative feature addresses one of the biggest challenges for combine operators: maintaining maximum throughput levels while keeping losses and the percentage of damaged grain at low levels. The new automatic combine setting system takes automation to a new level: while current systems are reactive, New Holland’s solution proactively predicts changes in slope and crop density, making corrective adjustments before overload or losses even occur,” said Lars Skjoldager Sørensen, head of harvesting product line.

Maximum throughput, minimum losses and damaged grain, less operator fatigue

Once past yields, field topography and all combine settings based on GPS positioning data are programmed into the combine, during the first pass of the following harvest campaign, the system will interpolate the data and the setting system will respond rapidly to varying conditions.

The proactive system relies on traditional sensors and control systems that have been supplemented by industry first cleaning shoe load sensing, Field and Yield prediction, and remote rotor vanes.

The operator can choose different operation modes ranging from maximum throughput to maximum grain quality – always optimizing power efficiency. Using the data stored into the system, the combine will optimize its settings by itself – and before the header actually starts cutting and taking in the crop.

Industry first cleaning shoe pressure sensors prevent grain losses before they occur

The new pressure sensors on the cleaning system introduce a new way of measuring the load of the cleaning shoe. New Holland’s innovative system measures the difference in pressure across the upper sieve, which gives a very precise indication of the cleaning shoe load. Based on this data, the system proactively maximises cleaning shoe performance and prevents losses.

If losses do occur, the system is able to immediately identify the cause and make the necessary corrections very fast.

This translates into faster and smaller corrections to the sieve opening and fan speed, resulting in the cleaning shoe performing at higher capacity level in a stable way. This in turn enables the operator to increase productivity – with the added advantage of not having to continuously make manual adjustments, significantly reducing fatigue.

Self-learning Field and Yield Prediction proactively optimises settings for conditions ahead

New Holland’s new automation system takes a proactive approach to correcting settings according to changing harvest conditions. The Field and Yield Prediction system is a self-learning tool that predicts changes in slope and crop density in front of the combine.

It uses topology data to anticipate conditions ahead of the header. In order to predict the yield ahead of the combine, it extrapolates the yield of the adjacent passes already harvested and the GPS Yield Mapping data of previous passes programmed into the combine. The automation system proactively optimises the settings accordingly.

This results in more reliable and smoother actions that improves the combine’s overall performance and output without any intervention from the driver, further reducing operator fatigue.

Automatic rotor vane adjustment improves power efficiency and reduces losses

The combine automatically changes the angle of all the rotor vanes according to the crop load, which has a direct impact on the time the crop remains in the rotors and the rotor’s power requirements. This means that the automated system is able to improve the rotor’s power efficiency without impacting the threshing and separation settings improving fuel savings and performance.The combine adapts automatically to changing crop conditions or between different crop types, increasing daily productivity and reducing the time required for conversion between crops. This new feature reduces the power consumed in the rotors up to 20 per cent.

“We are very proud of this award, which is testament to New Holland’s commitment to harnessing technology and innovation to help its customers in their constant drive for efficiency and productivity,” commented Alessandro Maritano, Vice President EMEA, New Holland Agriculture. “We have developed a self-learning and proactive system that acts faster, optimizing and stabilizing the combine process while reducing the need for operator intervention. With this automation system we are taking another step forward in the automation of the complete combine harvest process. This innovative feature contributes to the exceptional performance of the recently launched CR Revelation, the world’s most powerful, high capacity combine: with a redesigned residue management system, improved adjustable crop flow, and further power upgrade, it delivers up 10 per cent more capacity while guaranteeing grain quality and outstanding residue management.”
Published in Corporate News
More New Brunswick students are digging into agriculture this year thanks to the launch of the new Agriculture in the Classroom program.

The program supports teachers with educational resources and provides hands-on learning experiences to students. The program is designed to connect more students with agriculture and nurture an appreciation for the nutritious food grown in the province.

The Agriculture in the Classroom project will receive $60,000 from the New Brunswick Food and Beverage Strategy. It will also receive $19,900 from the Growing Forward 2 program that is cost-shared on a 60-40 basis between the federal and provincial governments. For the full story, click here

Related: Government invests over half a million dollars to develop education surrounding the agriculture sector
Published in Consumer Issues
In celebration of Canada and Ontario’s 150th anniversary and to recognize the history and diversity of Ontario’s agri-food sector, OMAFRA is offering complimentary commemorative signs to families, farming communities, and properties that have been linked to agricultural production for the past 150 years.

You many apply or nominate someone by October 31, 2017. There is no supporting documentation required. Simply provide a description about your farming activities and commodities associated with it, the scale of farming operations, and your contact information.

To apply or nominate, visit: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/rural/ontario150.htm

Published in Corporate News
This past spring, Viterra, a leading marketer and handler of grains, oilseeds and pulses, provided the Canadian Foodgrains Bank with access to 42 acres of land to farm around its terminals in Balgonie, Saskatchewan and Stettler, Alberta.

Two farmers from each of the areas volunteered their time to farm the land, and proceeds from the sale of the crop will be donated to the Foodgrains Bank to support its food assistance programs for countries in the developing world. READ MORE
Published in Corporate News
Improving food literacy – the ability to make healthy food choices – through activities such as hands-on cooking, exposure to new foods, and farm and gardening activities can help build the skills required to plan, purchase and prepare healthier foods. These activities help encourage children to make healthy eating choices and supports healthy living.

The Honourable Ginette Petitpas Taylor, Minister of Health, recently announced funding for the Farm to School: Canada Digs in! Initiative. This innovative program, launched today, aims to empower and educate students in schools and on campuses about healthy eating. She was joined by Dr. Theresa Tam, Chief Public Health Officer of Canada.

Farm to School: Canada Digs in! will bring healthy, locally grown food into schools, and provide students with hands-on opportunities to learn about healthy food options, meal preparation, sustainable food systems, local food production, marketing and distribution.

Program activities will allow children and youth to benefit from greater availability of healthy, local and sustainable foods in schools and on campuses across Canada. This project also supports the Government of Canada's Healthy Eating Strategy, which aims to make healthy food choice the easy choice.
Published in Consumer Issues
With four available jobs for every agriculture graduate today there has never been a better time for students from both rural and urban locations across the country to consider an education in agriculture or an agriculture/food-related field.

That's just the path 65 students who have earned $1,500 Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarships are starting down as they enter their first year of agriculture or food-related studies at Canadian universities and colleges this fall. Unique to the winners' list this year is a student who grew up on an Alpaca farm in the Yukon.

"Farming in the isolated north has its own unique set of challenges where the winters are brutally long, the climate is unforgivingly dry and the cost of supplies ridiculously high," wrote Kataya Ulrich from Northern Spirit Alpaca Farm located just outside the city limits of Whitehorse, Yukon. "But global warming is beginning to alter the realities of our harsh climate. Our winters are not as cold and we are experiencing more moisture and a longer growing season. The agricultural economy is growing and with the right focus, I think it has the potential for great success."

Traditionally the Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarship Program required applicants to be from a farm and entering agriculture or an agricultural-related field of study. In honour of the program's 25th anniversary last year, and the recognition of the close connection between farming and food, eligibility for the Opportunity Scholarship Program was extended to students pursuing studies in food-related fields of study, regardless of whether they grew up on a farm or not.

"Our program has always been about supporting young people in their pursuit of a diploma or degree in agriculture because we need the very best to consider agriculture as a career path so our industry can continue to grow and prosper," said Trish Jordan, director of public and industry affairs with Monsanto Canada. "Our decision to open up the program to students interested in a food-related career was driven by a desire to close the gap between farming and food. It also acknowledges that agriculture truly is all about food."

Thousands of deserving Canadian students have received a total of more than $1.9 million since the scholarship program launched using corporate funds in 1991. Transition to the Monsanto Fund in 2012 has enabled more students to win scholarships due to consistent funding for the program.

All applications were reviewed by an independent judging panel comprised of: Robert Adamson, consultant and program director with Pembina Trails School Division; Johanne Ross, Executive Director of Agriculture in the Classroom-Canada.; JoAnne Buth, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian International Grains Institute; Crystal Jorgenson, Communications Specialist with the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences at the University of Manitoba; Ellen Pruden, Education and Promotion Manager for the Manitoba Canola Growers Association; and Brigitte Burgoyne, Communications Manager, Richardson International.

Administered on behalf of the Monsanto Fund by Agriculture in the Classroom-Manitoba Inc. (AITC-M), the scholarship program received 156 applications from across Canada this year.

"We are thrilled to serve as the independent administrator of the Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarship Program," said Sue Clayton, executive director of AITC-M. "Our organization is focused on connecting students to agriculture, exposing them to the role agriculture plays in their lives and opening their eyes to the many opportunities available to build a career in agriculture. It's rewarding for us to see so many students wanting to explore education and careers in agriculture."

Details on the launch of the 2018 Monsanto Fund Opportunity Scholarship Program will be released in February 2018 and will also be available online at www.monsanto.ca
Published in Corporate News
Harvest and Prosper is a program supported jointly by the Prince Edward Island government and provincial industry groups, that helps to meet the agriculture sector’s workforce demands during its busy harvest season. It has opportunities for up to 50 newcomers and social assistance and disability support clients, and also coaches and mentors participants to overcome future barriers to employment.

“There are great jobs available in farming, with the sector employing over 3,800 people in peak periods,” says Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Alan McIsaac. “With seven agricultural operations participating, Harvest and Prosper fills a real need for farmers during this busy season.” READ MORE
Published in Corporate News

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine

Latest Events

2018 Irrigated Crop Production Update
Tue Jan 16, 2018 @ 8:00AM - 03:00PM
Canola Day – Manitoba Ag Days
Tue Jan 16, 2018 @ 9:00AM - 12:00PM
Food Evolution ~ public screening event
Tue Jan 16, 2018 @ 6:30PM - 09:45PM
Intercropping Innovators Workshop
Wed Jan 24, 2018 @ 8:00AM - 05:00PM
Pacific Agriculture Show
Thu Jan 25, 2018