Equipment
Narrow row spacing is considered the accepted practice for maximizing grain yields for the majority of crops under most circumstances. However, wider row spacing offers advantages for dealing with heavier and taller crop residues, and reducing equipment costs and maintenance. But how wide is too wide before yield is compromised?
Published in Canola
The New Holland T6.175 Dynamic Command tractor was crowned Machine of the Year 2018 in the Mid Class Tractor category at the Agritechnica trade show in Hanover, Germany.

The machine received the coveted award for its technical innovation and the benefits it brings to customers, with selection criteria focusing on innovative features, performance, productivity, cost of operation, ease of use and operator comfort.

“This award is testament to New Holland’s long-standing leadership of the mixed farming and dairy segment. It is a well-deserved recognition of the hard work and dedication of all those involved in the development of the T6.175 Dynamic Command tractor, who worked tirelessly to produce a tractor that meets the specific requests of our customers,” said Carlo Lambro, President of New Holland Agriculture Brand.

In August 2017, New Holland announced it is expanding its acclaimed T6 Series offering with the new T6 Dynamic Command option. These new T6.145, T6.155, T6.165 and T6.175 are the only tractors in the segment featuring a 24x24 semi powershift transmission on the market. They are versatile tractors that will be an asset to the fleets of dairy, livestock, and hay and forage operations.

For more information, visit: http://www.newholland.com/na
Published in Tractors
When researchers at the Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute (PAMI) heard that some producers were looking toward the practice of straight cutting shatter-resistant canola varieties, they set out to find the true post-harvest comparison of straight cut or swath.
Published in Canola
Last year, Ontario had its first-ever detection of clubroot symptoms in canola. On the heels of that discovery came an even more unsettling surprise – a survey found the pathogen scattered across the province’s main canola-growing areas and this year, the symptoms are showing up in more fields.
Published in Canola
The grain industry is adopting innovation from motor racing specialists when it comes to new technology and materials designed to reduce the risk of fires in headers. READ MORE
Published in Harvesting
Seed Hawk Inc. is pleased to announce that the company will officially be renamed Vaderstad Industries Inc. on October 31, 2017. The name change reflects the fuller integration of the Seed Hawk brand within the Väderstad Group, bringing precision and quality together.

“We are pleased to become a part of Väderstad. Both businesses are leaders in the development of some of the world’s most innovative agricultural equipment,” says Nigel Jones, CEO of Vaderstad Industries Inc., and continues, “the joining of our businesses will positively impact the advancement and availability of our equipment for farmers in North America and around the world.”

Seed Hawk and Väderstad have been working together since 2006. In 2013, the Swedish high quality agricultural equipment manufacturer took full ownership of Seed Hawk. The current name change reflects the fuller integration of the Seed Hawk brand within the Väderstad Group. This transition was signaled by the change earlier this year to red paint on all Seed Hawk seeding systems, consistent with Väderstad branded equipment.

“Väderstad and Seed Hawk have brought quality and precision together for the last ten years. Our name change to Vaderstad Industries Inc. reflects the long-term commitment we put behind this promise to our customers.” Jones says, and adds:

“The company name is changing to Vaderstad Industries Inc. The Seed Hawk seeder will continue to be sold under the same equipment name and by the same local people our customers know and trust.”
Published in Corporate News
The latest calculator was released in January and is an update on a tool called CROPPLAN Financial Analysis. It was designed by two farm management specialists from Manitoba, Roy Arnott of Killarney and Darren Bond of Teulon.
Published in Business Management
With large dollars and major tax implications hanging in the balance, farmers need to take the time to carefully weigh financing options for any and every acquisition of farm equipment. Whether you should lease or buy your next major farm purchase cannot be answered with a one-size-fits-all set of rules, says Rick Battistoni, chartered professional accountant, and a partner with MNP, a national accounting, tax and business consulting firm. Rather, he says, one’s financing decisions depend on your farm’s specific needs, priorities and financial reality.
Published in Business Management
Farmers keep a close eye on the yield monitor as their combines roll across the field. GSI (Grain Systems, Inc.) recommends that growers also monitor their grain storage system during harvest and rate its performance once the season’s over.

“Evaluating how well their grain system handled the harvest season, and what improvements may be needed, is one of the most important steps farmers can take to help prepare for next year,” says Gary Woodruff, GSI conditioning applications manager.

Woodruff suggests farmers keep track of any grain handling, drying or storage issues, and then give their grain system a post-harvest “report card” based on the following considerations:
  • Material handling – How well did grain handing equipment – dump pits, grain legs and other conveyors – perform in loading and unloading of grain? If bottlenecks were experienced, consider adding faster, higher-capacity handling equipment for next season.
  • Dryer capacity – Ideally, grain should be dried the same day it is harvested. If wet grain remained in a hopper tank longer than one day, plan to add drying capacity next season to protect grain quality.
  • Grain storage capacity – Did grain bins have adequate storage for the bushels harvested? If not, and it was necessary to transport more grain than expected to an elevator, expanded storage may be a wise investment for 2018. Hauling grain to an elevator not only entails storage costs, but may also can take time away from harvest for transportation.
  • Safety – Post-harvest is also a good time to consider possible system enhancements, such as improving safety. This can include installing roof stairs or peak platforms on bins, checking to see if bin safety cages are secure, and making sure all safety shields on motor drives and dump points are in good condition.
  • Maintenance – Grain bins and dryers should be thoroughly cleaned of debris as soon as they are empty and the entire storage system inspected, so that all equipment will be ready for next season. Common maintenance needs can include repairing and/or replacing worn motors and belts, damaged down spouts, noisy gear boxes, worn flights on augers and oil leaks. “The off-season is a much better time to address these issues, rather than waiting until the busy spring or summer periods, when dealers are booked and required parts may be difficult to find in time for harvest,” Woodruff notes.
“Farmers know the importance of inspecting and cleaning their combine following the harvest season,” says Woodruff. “It’s just as important to evaluate their grain system to be sure it will efficiently meet their storage needs for next season.”

For more information, farmers can contact their GSI dealer or visit www.grainsystems.com.

Published in Storage
Trelleborg announces the launch of its latest innovation – the PneuTrac, a solution that combines the advantages both of radial argicultural tires and tracks.

Vineyards and orchards form two critical parts of agricultural production and both face unique challenges, notably in root protection and terrain. Vineyards often incorporate steep terrain and along with orchards, typically have narrow row operations with small spaces between vines or trees.

Tracked applications can often be too wide to pass between rows with a comfortable margin for error.

“PneuTrac delivers unbeatable performance on both steep slopes and muddy terrain, reducing downtime to zero in demanding conditions. PneuTrac combines the advantages of a radial agricultural tire in terms of fuel efficiency, comfort and handling, with the footprint and traction benefits of a track.." said Lorenzo Ciferri, VP marketing and communications at Trelleborg Wheel Systems.

PneuTrac contains the best-in-class features of Trelleborg agricultural tires along with a new sidewall utilizing CupWheel Technology by Galileo Wheel Ltd. The innovative “Omega” design of the sidewall helps the carcass to sustain load, simultaneously providing flexibility and an extra-wide footprint, resulting in very low soil compaction.

This new design allows the tread to work at 100 per cent of its potential efficiency. The Progressive Traction technology on the tread itself enhances traction whilst the inter-lug terraces improve the self-cleaning capability of the tire. The wide lug bases combined with a robust shoulder feature, increase lateral stability, especially on slopes.

“When designing the PneuTrac we focused on the specialist requirements of key producers. For example, the roots of vines are incredibly precious and susceptible to damage. As with conventional agriculture, the top soil needs to be protected and machine slippage could easily be a disaster for both the soil and roots," Ciferri said. “We firmly believe that PneuTrac is a game changing innovation and that it again demonstrates our commitment to sustainable farming, helping to protect some of our most valuable agricultural assets.”

PneuTrac will be on display at Agritechnica 2017, November 12 to 18 in Hannover, Germany. 
Published in Corporate News
The Climate Corporation, a subsidiary of Monsanto Company, recently announced at the Farms.com Precision Agriculture Conference, the launch of the Climate FieldView digital agriculture platform into Western Canada for the 2018 growing season.

With Climate’s analytics-based digital tools, more Canadian farmers will be able to harness their data in one connected platform to identify and more efficiently manage variability in their fields, tailoring crop inputs to optimize yield and maximize their return on every acre.

In September 2016, the company first announced the introduction of the Climate FieldView platform in Eastern Canada, where hundreds of farmers across nearly one million acres have been experiencing the value of data-driven, digital tools on their operations.

Now, farmers in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta will have the ability to use the Climate FieldView platform to uncover personalized field insights to support the many crucial decisions they make each season to enhance crop productivity.

“The Climate FieldView platform is a one-stop shop for simple field data management, helping Canadian farmers get the most out of every acre,” said Denise Hockaday, Canada business lead for The Climate Corporation. “Through the delivery of the platform’s powerful data analytics and customized field insights, farmers across Canada have the power to tailor their agronomic practices more precisely than ever before, fine tuning their action plans for the best outcome at the end of the season.”

Over the past year, the Climate FieldView platform had a strong testing effort across many farm operations in Western Canada, enabling the Climate team to further develop the platform’s compatibility with all types of farm equipment and crops, including canola and wheat, to collect and analyze field data from multiple sources.

“Part of the challenge with data is managing all of the numbers and having an adequate cloud system to store and effectively analyze the information,” said farmer D’Arcy Hilgartner of Alberta, who participated in testing the Climate FieldView platform on his operation this season. “The Climate FieldView platform instantly transfers the field data gathered from my farm equipment into my Climate FieldView account, which is especially useful during harvest season because I’m able to see where various crop inputs were used and analyze the corresponding yield. I’ve really enjoyed having this digital platform at my disposal, and I’m excited to see the positive impacts on my business this coming year.”

As Climate continues to expand its digital technologies to help more farmers access advanced agronomic insights, additional new data layers will feed the company’s unmatched R&D engine, ultimately enabling the development of valuable new features for farmers in the Climate FieldView platform.

In August 2017, the company announced the acceleration of R&D advancements through the company’s robust innovation pipeline, along with new product features and enhancements to help farmers manage their field variability more precisely than ever before.

Launched in 2015, the Climate FieldView platform is on more than 120 million acres with more than 100,000 users across the United States, Canada and Brazil. It has quickly become the most broadly connected platform in the industry and continues to expand into new global regions.

Climate FieldView Platform Offering in Western Canada

  • Data Connectivity - Farmers can collect, store and visualize their field data in one easy-to-use digital platform through the Climate FieldView Drive, a device that easily streams field data directly into the Climate FieldView platform. FieldView Drive works with many tractors and combines across Canada, in addition to anhydrous applicators and air seeders, helping farmers easily collect field data for the agronomic inputs they manage throughout the season. Recently, The Climate Corporation announced a new data connectivity agreement with AGCO, providing more farmers even more options to connect their equipment to the Climate FieldView platform. In addition to the FieldView Drive, farmers can connect their field data to their Climate FieldView account through Precision Planting LLC's monitors, cloud-to-cloud connection with other agricultural software systems such as the John Deere Operations Center, and through manual file upload.
  • Yield Analysis Tools - With Climate’s seed performance and analysis tools, farmers can see what worked and what didn’t at the field level or by field zone, and apply those insights to better understand field variability by quickly and easily comparing digital field maps side-by-side. Farmers can save regions of their fields in a yield-by-region report and can also save and record a field region report through enhanced drawing and note taking tools, retrieving the report at a later date for easy analysis on any portion of their field to better understand how their crops are performing.
  • Advanced Field Health Imagery - Through frequent and consistent, high-quality satellite imagery, farmers can instantly visualize and analyze crop performance, helping them identify issues early, prioritize scouting and take action early to protect yield. Climate's proprietary imagery process provides consistent imagery quality and frequency by using high-resolution imagery with vegetative data from multiple images, in addition to advanced cloud identification. Farmers can also drop geo-located scouting pins on field health images and navigate back to those spots for a closer look, or share with agronomic partners.
  • Seeding and Fertility Scripting - Farmers can manage their inputs to optimize yield in every part of their field with manual variable rate seed and fertility scripting tools. Through Climate’s manual seed scripting tools, farmers can easily create detailed planting plans for their fields to build a hybrid specific prescription tailored to their unique goals, saving time and improving productivity. Additionally, Climate offers a manual fertility scripting tool, enabling farmers the ability to optimize their inputs with a customized management plan for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and lime tailored to their unique goals.

2018 Availability and Pricing

The Climate FieldView platform is currently available for purchase in Western Canada on a per-acre basis so that farmers can begin using it on their farms in time for the 2018 growing season. To experience the complete value of the platform throughout the entire growing season, farmers should sign up for a Climate FieldView account by Jan. 1, 2018. For more information about the Climate FieldView platform and pricing, contact Climate Support at 1.888.924.7475 or visit www.climatefieldview.ca.
Published in Precision Ag
New Holland Agriculture was awarded the silver medal by the independent expert committee appointed by the DLG German Agricultural Society for its pro-active and automatic combine setting system – the first in the industry – for its CR Revelation combines.

“This innovative feature addresses one of the biggest challenges for combine operators: maintaining maximum throughput levels while keeping losses and the percentage of damaged grain at low levels. The new automatic combine setting system takes automation to a new level: while current systems are reactive, New Holland’s solution proactively predicts changes in slope and crop density, making corrective adjustments before overload or losses even occur,” said Lars Skjoldager Sørensen, head of harvesting product line.

Maximum throughput, minimum losses and damaged grain, less operator fatigue

Once past yields, field topography and all combine settings based on GPS positioning data are programmed into the combine, during the first pass of the following harvest campaign, the system will interpolate the data and the setting system will respond rapidly to varying conditions.

The proactive system relies on traditional sensors and control systems that have been supplemented by industry first cleaning shoe load sensing, Field and Yield prediction, and remote rotor vanes.

The operator can choose different operation modes ranging from maximum throughput to maximum grain quality – always optimizing power efficiency. Using the data stored into the system, the combine will optimize its settings by itself – and before the header actually starts cutting and taking in the crop.

Industry first cleaning shoe pressure sensors prevent grain losses before they occur

The new pressure sensors on the cleaning system introduce a new way of measuring the load of the cleaning shoe. New Holland’s innovative system measures the difference in pressure across the upper sieve, which gives a very precise indication of the cleaning shoe load. Based on this data, the system proactively maximises cleaning shoe performance and prevents losses.

If losses do occur, the system is able to immediately identify the cause and make the necessary corrections very fast.

This translates into faster and smaller corrections to the sieve opening and fan speed, resulting in the cleaning shoe performing at higher capacity level in a stable way. This in turn enables the operator to increase productivity – with the added advantage of not having to continuously make manual adjustments, significantly reducing fatigue.

Self-learning Field and Yield Prediction proactively optimises settings for conditions ahead

New Holland’s new automation system takes a proactive approach to correcting settings according to changing harvest conditions. The Field and Yield Prediction system is a self-learning tool that predicts changes in slope and crop density in front of the combine.

It uses topology data to anticipate conditions ahead of the header. In order to predict the yield ahead of the combine, it extrapolates the yield of the adjacent passes already harvested and the GPS Yield Mapping data of previous passes programmed into the combine. The automation system proactively optimises the settings accordingly.

This results in more reliable and smoother actions that improves the combine’s overall performance and output without any intervention from the driver, further reducing operator fatigue.

Automatic rotor vane adjustment improves power efficiency and reduces losses

The combine automatically changes the angle of all the rotor vanes according to the crop load, which has a direct impact on the time the crop remains in the rotors and the rotor’s power requirements. This means that the automated system is able to improve the rotor’s power efficiency without impacting the threshing and separation settings improving fuel savings and performance.The combine adapts automatically to changing crop conditions or between different crop types, increasing daily productivity and reducing the time required for conversion between crops. This new feature reduces the power consumed in the rotors up to 20 per cent.

“We are very proud of this award, which is testament to New Holland’s commitment to harnessing technology and innovation to help its customers in their constant drive for efficiency and productivity,” commented Alessandro Maritano, Vice President EMEA, New Holland Agriculture. “We have developed a self-learning and proactive system that acts faster, optimizing and stabilizing the combine process while reducing the need for operator intervention. With this automation system we are taking another step forward in the automation of the complete combine harvest process. This innovative feature contributes to the exceptional performance of the recently launched CR Revelation, the world’s most powerful, high capacity combine: with a redesigned residue management system, improved adjustable crop flow, and further power upgrade, it delivers up 10 per cent more capacity while guaranteeing grain quality and outstanding residue management.”
Published in Corporate News
Harvest timing can have a huge impact on soybean shatter losses, according to North Dakota State University Extension Service agricultural engineer Ken Hellevang.

Because harvest losses increase dramatically when the moisture content is below 11 per cent, harvesting during high humidity such as early morning or late evening or damp conditions may reduce shatter loss, Hellevang notes.

Many times, the discount for delivering beans with a moisture content in excess of 13 per cent may be less than the discount for shatter losses from harvesting overly dry soybeans. For the full story, click here

Related: PAMI uncovers keys to higher returns on soybeans
Published in Harvesting
A local company focused on robotic cutting solutions is experimenting with an ultra-high pressure no-till system. A-Cubed (Advanced Agriculture Applications) is using fluid jets in place of coulters on standard, commercially available seeding equipment they’ve modified.

The goal, according to Agricultural Business Development Manager Jeff Martel, is for farmers using no-till (planting without tilling the soil) to cut cleanly through heavy residues and cover crops using water – either on its own or potentially supplemented with inputs like lime or fertilizer, for example.

Leading development of the technology has been the South Australia No-Till Farmers Association (SANTFA) – and a connection between SANTFA and Martel brought the idea to Canada, where Martel’s employer I-Cubed Industry Innovators is now launching A-Cubed to move the technology forward.

Initial plot trials by the company last year produced intriguing results. Fluid jet-planted corn had a 20 per cent higher yield by weight than the same corn planted conventionally in the next rows. And each fluid jet-planted soybean plant held more pods than the conventionally planted soybeans and had significantly bigger and longer root systems. Germination time was a day sooner on average for the fluid jet-planted plants too.

This year, employees Matt Popper and Will Whitwell, who are also both farmers, modified a six-row John Deer planter with the technology and used that planter to successfully plant corn into hay and soybeans into corn stubble.

“The more we know, the more we don’t know and the more we need to find out about the agronomics, the chemistry, etc.,” said Martel. “What if we want to use fertilizer instead of water? We know we can inject liquid and granular fertilizer, but how do we know it’s beneficial, how do we monitor and measure?”

According to Martel, the planter and pump are available to Ontario farmers or researchers interested in working with A-Cubed to investigate some of these questions, and he’s been reaching out to North American agronomists to showcase some of their early results and seek advice. Research on the technology is underway in Australia and in China, too.

The company’s immediate goal is to develop a small liquid jet no-till system designed for research purposes that could “open the door in a thousand directions for research.” He also envisions a retrofit kit for farmers to use on existing equipment, as well as a commercially available planter equipped with water jets.

The technology could be most beneficial in moderate to high rainfall areas where the ground underneath the cover is softer and it’s harder to cut through residue.

“This doesn’t care whether it’s wet or dry. You don’t have to wait for dew to dry off, you can plant around the clock,” Popper said, adding that because the technology is cutting so cleanly into the ground, another benefit could be a reduction in tractor horsepower needed.
Published in Seeding/Planting
Ontario farmers who are thinking about growing a non-traditional crop have a valuable new tool to assess whether it’s a profitable idea. Making a Case for Growing New Crops is an online learning resource recently developed by the Agri-Food Management Institute (AMI) to help farmers engage in business planning before planting.

“This resource will help you decide if that new crop is right for your farm at this time,” says Ashley Honsberger, Executive Director of AMI. According to Honsberger, farmers are increasingly looking at non-traditional crops to meet new customer preferences, realize higher value per acre, or for crop rotation and other environmental benefits.

The resource was developed in partnership with the Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA), who surveyed members earlier this year to gauge interest in growing new crops, as well as the best method of delivering information. “We know Ontario farmers are interested in growing new crops, and are looking for timely information on marketing a crop, finding buyers and locating processors,” says OFA President Keith Currie. “We appreciated providing AMI with industry input on a resource that will ultimately support farm business management and reduce the risk of expanding into a new crop.”

Making a Case for Growing New Crops – the new free online resource available in the Resources for Farmers section of www.takeanewapproach.ca features five interactive modules that users work through on their own schedule to develop a business case for diversifying their farm.

Through a series of videos and worksheets, users can determine whether the crop is an agronomic fit, identify customers and markets, analyze their cost of production and develop a budget. In the end, they will have a personalized and confidential report that includes a business model canvas (a one-page visual business plan) as well as an action plan to share with their team and use to communicate with their advisors and lenders.

“Whatever the reason, taking time to build a business case for growing new crops makes sense,” says Honsberger. “While we encourage farmers to take a new approach, we also want them to really evaluate the opportunity and manage any potential risks associated with growing new crops.”

Of the 402 farmers responding to the online survey about new crops – as part of the Making a Case for Growing News Crops project – about 20 per cent had tried a new crop in the past five years. The main reasons farmers chose to trying something new included: changing markets and emerging opportunities (29 per cent), crop rotation and environmental benefits (24 per cent), and reducing overall risk through diversification (24 per cent). And 27 per cent of farmers said they develop a business plan before beginning a new crop opportunity.

For growers who had not introduced a new crop in the last five years, 7 per cent plan to in the next two years, 49 per cent do not plan to, and 44 per cent were undecided. These results suggest farmers are open to new crop opportunities, but are hesitant and unsure of how successful they may be.

The survey findings also contributed to OFA’s submission for the Bring Home the World: Improving Access to Ontario’s World Foods consultationby the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.
Published in Seeding/Planting
HORSCH, a global manufacturer of seeding, planting, tillage, and application equipment, is proud to introduce Canola Ready Technology for its Maestro SW row crop planters.

The new Canola Ready Technology consists of a small seeds kit, including a set of stainless steel seed discs and quick-change meter components for fast conversion from row crops to canola. The kit allows producers unmatched precision seed placement and significant input savings when seeding canola.

With the Maestro SW row crop planter equipped with Canola Ready Technology, canola producers are experiencing seed cost savings of 50 per cent or more per acre versus air seeders without sacrifice to yield, due to lower seed mortality rate and improved precision seed placement.

“The seed savings alone in canola gains an extra $30-40+ per acre of margin. Features such as individual row shut off to control seeding overlap, curve compensation, and auto row unit downforce control add even more seed savings,” says Jeremy Hughes, product manager at HORSCH. “Beyond seed cost savings, the uniform emergence and consistent crop development seen in seeding canola with the Maestro is adding tremendous benefits to crop health management and harvest quality. These all have positive benefits on the farmer’s bottom line”.”

“The Corn Belt is moving north,” adds Hughes. “The changes in crop rotations are shifting more toward canola/soybeans/small grains/corn in areas such as northern North Dakota and into the Prairie Provinces of Western Canada. The past two generations of farmers have primarily used air seeder technology for seeding crops. As our producers seek more precise seeding technologies for canola along with incorporating significant acres of soybeans and corn into their rotations, row crop planters become more viable in these areas. Maestro SW’s row unit and singulation technology provides superior seed placement precision for all of these crops.”

The Canola Ready Technology is available to use on all Maestro SW row crop planter models. Maestro SW planters are available in 40’ and 60’ toolbar widths with row spacing of 15”, 20”, 22” or 30”.

For more information, contact HORSCH LLC, 200 Knutson Street, Mapleton, SD 58059; call 1-855-4HORSCH; email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; or visit www.horsch.com.

Published in Machinery
Farmers Edge™, a global leader in decision agriculture, announced today a strategic partnership to bring Planet’s best-in-class global monitoring data and platform capabilities to the Farmers Edge precision agriculture product suite.

Planet is an integrated aerospace and data platform company that operates the world’s largest fleet of earth imaging satellites, collecting the largest quantity of earth imagery. Farmers Edge is now a sole distributor for Planet in key agricultural regions, with the right to use and distribute high-resolution, high-frequency imagery from Planet’s three flagship satellite constellations.

Through this multimillion-dollar, multi-year global distribution agreement, Farmers Edge and Planet are significantly expanding their existing partnership. The companies will deliver the vanguard of remote sensing driven and analytics-based agronomy services to growers worldwide.

Farmers Edge customers will be among the first to take advantage of field-centric, consistent, and accurate insights from satellite imagery. While traditional imagery products provide only a partial, delayed, or inconsistent view of fields, this partnership equips Farmers Edge growers with comprehensive, high-quality field imagery more frequently updated than any other company in the industry.

“Until now, the challenge with satellite imagery was the data was simply not frequent enough to react to crop stress in a timely manner,” said Wade Barnes, President and CEO of Farmers Edge. “At Farmers Edge, providing our customers with the most concise, comprehensive, and consistent data is at the core of what we do. We understand the need for more image frequency, that’s why we are partnering with Planet. Daily imagery is a game-changer in the digital ag space.”

The combination of Planet’s unprecedented data set and Farmers Edge state-of-the-art image processing technology allows for early crop monitoring and gives growers the best opportunity to correct factors that could limit crop performance and compromise yield potential.

Growers will now have a wealth of field-centric data updated throughout the growing season, including early monitoring of crop stand, detection of pest and weed pressure, drainage issues, hail damage, herbicide injuries, nutrient deficiencies, yield prediction and more.

“Farmers Edge is consistently at the cutting edge of innovation in agricultural technology, and we’re proud to expand our partnership with them as we work to improve profitability, sustainability, and efficiency for the world’s producers,” said Will Marshall, CEO of Planet. “The challenges faced by the agriculture industry are complex in nature and global in scale, and we believe our data is uniquely positioned to solve agricultural challenges.”

“Retailers, co-ops, equipment dealers, agronomists, and all other important advisors to the farmer can now partner with Farmers Edge and leverage this industry changing capability within their business,” said Ron Osborne, Chief Strategy Officer of Farmers Edge. “We're pleased to be able to help so many in our industry manage risks, in near real-time. This is great for our customers, our partners, and agriculture.”

In 2016, Planet awarded Farmers Edge its Agriculture Award, recognizing the company’s pioneering work with ag-based analytics, Variable Rate Technology and field-centric data management.
Published in Corporate News
Precision mapping technology is increasingly user-friendly. In fact, Aaron Breimer, general manager of precision agriculture consulting firm Veritas Farm Business Management, says some precision map-writing software is so simple a producer can segment zones or draw a boundary around a field with little more than the click of a mouse. The challenge is that the maps are only as accurate as the information used to create them.
Published in Precision Ag
Anheuser-Busch InBev (AB InBev) and Agrible, Inc. today announce a global partnership to improve barley production while minimizing environmental impact. The two companies are joining forces to help farmers around the world access better data and predictive analytics on crop management and climate effects. AB InBev is the largest brewer and user of malt barley in the world.

In 2013, AB InBev created SmartBarley—an innovative platform and incubator which leverages data, technology, and insights to help farmers solve challenges and improve their productivity and environmental performance.

Today, SmartBarley is present in 13 countries across 5 continents. To enhance AB InBev’s SmartBarley program, Agrible will provide farmers with access to their proprietary software, Morning Farm Report®. This software helps growers detect disease threats earlier, improve logistics planning, monitor crops on all fields, and improve quality.

Agrible and AB InBev began their work together in 2016 on a project to forecast barley yield (or production) and quality factors through better crop modeling and predictive analytics for American farmers.

The relationship has developed beyond the United States into a major international expansion. AB InBev farmers will soon have access to Agrible’s technology across multiple countries on a variety of crops, beginning with South Africa, Mexico, Uruguay, Brazil, and Argentina.

Agrible and AB InBev will also work together to develop sustainability insights and metrics in areas such as water use, land efficiency, and the carbon footprint from growing and sourcing ingredients.

“We are very excited to form this relationship with AB InBev to continue bringing world class software, predictive analytics, and expertise to farmers everywhere,” says Chris Harbourt, CEO of Agrible. “Our insights can truly change the face of agriculture across the globe and help companies of all sizes capture efficiencies and make their operations more sustainable.”

“Quality ingredients are the key to brewing our world class beers. Morning Farm Report from Agrible is an exciting addition to our ongoing work in agricultural development to help our farmers around the world produce the best barley possible while also ensuring we are living up to our promise of creating a better world,” says Katie Hoard, Global Director of Agricultural Innovation at AB InBev.

With this international partnership, Agrible and AB InBev are leading the market in connecting farmers with real-time, actionable insights at the field level.
Published in Corporate News
Farmers in Alberta are being given the tools to take charge against climate change by adopting on-farm best management practices that are scientifically proven to limit the impacts of agriculture on natural resources like air, water and soil.

Fertilizer Canada is proud to announce the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Agricultural Research & Extension Council of Alberta (ARECA) that includes integration of 4R Nutrient Stewardship (Right Source @ Right Rate, Right Time, Right Place®) into the province's Environmental Farm Plan (EFP). This agreement marks a significant milestone on Fertilizer Canada's journey to create truly sustainable and climate-smart agriculture in Canada.

"We are pleased that ARECA has officially recognized 4R Nutrient Stewardship as a best practice for nutrient management on Alberta farms," said Garth Whyte, President and CEO of Fertilizer Canada. "By encouraging farmers across the province to use fertilizer effectively, Alberta is joining the front lines in the fight against climate change and ensuring their place among the world's leaders in sustainable agriculture."

"ARECA is a long-time supporter and promoter of 4R Nutrient Stewardship," said Janette McDonald, Executive Director. "There is no doubt this formalized partnership with Fertilizer Canada will aid us in expanding awareness of the program as a best practice for nutrient management planning."

4R Nutrient Stewardship is a science-based nutrient management system that is universally applicable yet locally focused. By applying the right source of fertilizer at the right rate, the right time and the right place, farmers can ensure nutrients are efficiently taken up by their crops and are not lost to air, water or soil. This increases crop productivity and reduces unwanted environmental impacts.

Managed by ARECA, the province's EFP self-assessment process encourages producers to assess and identify environmental risks on their farms and take action to improve their practices.

"While Alberta's EFPs already include a section on nutrient risks, adding information about the positive long-term benefits of 4R Nutrient Stewardship will expand awareness among the province's farmers," said Paul Watson, EFP Director at ARECA.

As growers in Alberta adopt 4R Nutrient Stewardship under the Alberta EFP, the acres they manage will be counted under Fertilizer Canada's 4R Designation program, which tracks the amount of Canadian farmland using 4R Nutrient Stewardship to boost productivity and conserve resources. Fertilizer Canada aims to capture 20 million 4R acres by 2020 – representing 25 per cent of Canadian farmland – to demonstrate to the world the commitment Canada's agriculture sector has made to adopt climate-smart and sustainable farm practices.

To learn more about 4R Nutrient Stewardship and the benefits it offers, visit www.fertilizercanada.ca

Learn more about the Alberta Environmental Farm Plan and the benefits it offers by visiting www.AlbertaEFP.com
Published in Corporate News
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