Environment
With high canola prices relative to other commodities, the temptation to run continuous canola is high. But does it really pay in the short term? A research study shows that net returns aren’t necessarily better, and that insect and disease pressures increase over time.
Published in Canola
Along with good agronomic practices, weather and growing conditions impact harvest seed yield and quality of annual field crops including canola. Although predicting growing season weather remains a challenge, a team of researchers wanted to know if it might be possible to predict canola quality prior to harvest by looking at growing season weather and environmental conditions during the crop year.
Published in Canola
In the 2015 International Year of Soils, two key global soil resources were published by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO) Intergovernmental Technical Panel on Soils (ITPS). The first Global Soil Partnership (GSP) effort was a revised World Soil Charter and the second was the first ever State of the World’s Soil Resources Report.
Published in Soil
The 2018 Ontario Forage Expo, featuring forage equipment demonstrations and trade show, will be held in July, hosted by the Ontario Forage Council, in conjunction with the Dufferin and Northumberland County Soil and Crop Improvement Associations.
Published in Other Crops
Ontario has a new strategy to help ensure the province’s agricultural soils remain healthy and productive for future generations.

“New Horizons: Ontario’s Agricultural Soil Health and Conservation Strategy” was developed in collaboration with the Agricultural Soil Health and Conservation Working Group, experts from provincial farm organizations, agri-food businesses, conservation organizations, the research community and other levels of government.

Healthy soil delivers numerous benefits including improved crop growth, yield and quality, water and nutrient retention, resilience, biodiversity, and climate change adaptation and mitigation.

Productive soils are the foundation of Ontario’s agri-food industry – an economic powerhouse that in 2016 accounted for 5.9 per cent of the province’s Gross Domestic Product, employed over 800,000 people and yielded more than $13 billion in farm cash receipts for Ontario farmers.

The soil strategy’s implementation and the long term monitoring of its actions will be guided by soil health partners and the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.

The strategy document can be found here
Published in Soil
The 2018 season is obviously off to a slow start following a significant storm system that brought freezing rain, ice pellets and snow to much of the province on the April 14th weekend. As of April 18th, it’s easy to find fields that are still snow covered, according to the latest report from FieldCropNews.com. | READ MORE
Published in Agronomy

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada scientist Louis-Pierre Comeau is sifting his way through New Brunswick soil in search of answers to one of the biggest issues facing local farmers: the loss of soil organic matter and the decrease of soil health in farm fields.

Published in Soil
Tile drainage is more affordable and more attractive than ever in Western Canada, but it is still a major investment with many implications that should be considered before calling for tenders.
Published in Soil
It’s 5 a.m. on a calm, sunny morning in June. Perfect time to spray? Not so fast. A temperature inversion is likely, which could result in small spray droplets remaining suspended in the air and moving off-target.
Published in Sprayers
Weed control is one of the main challenges for flax growers, and is even more challenging under organic production systems. Because flax is a poor competitor with weeds, yield losses can be significant when weeds are present. Cultural and mechanical control options can be effective techniques for weed suppression and control in flax.
Published in Weeds
Cutworms are a complex of several pest species that affect multiple crops grown in Canada. A few species can cause economic damage in cereal and oilseed field crops. Researchers are working to find efficient monitoring tools that can determine distribution of cutworms and alert growers to impending outbreaks, while excluding bee pollinators.
Published in Insect Pests
While putting his issue together, I was reminded just  how intricate (and complicated) disease is. Let’s look at Fusarium head blight (FHB) and its many forms as an example.
Published in Plant Breeding
Corn is a heavy user of phosphorus (P) and is sensitive to zinc (Zn) deficiencies. In northern corn growing areas typical of the Canadian Prairies, early season cold soils may limit P availability, especially on soils with high residue cover. Additionally, corn following canola, which does not host arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), might also have early season P and Zn deficiencies.
The goal of irrigation scheduling is to ensure the crop is never under water-induced stress that would limit yield potential. It involves determining the correct amount of irrigation water to apply to a crop at the right times to achieve optimum yield.
Published in Irrigation
Pivot irrigation is by far the most common method of irrigating crops in Western Canada. Over 80 per cent of the 1.7 million acres of Alberta’s irrigated land uses pivot systems. Low pressure pivots with drop tubes and spray nozzles have become the most common form of pivot irrigation due to water application and energy efficiency.
Published in Irrigation
This is important information for irrigation farmers to decide when to irrigate, but it’s equally important for dryland farmers to understand their soil moisture conditions when deciding on crop input requirements.
Published in Soil
From Ontario’s Essex County to Glengarry County (located 800 kilometres away), glyphosate resistant (GR) Canada fleabane is wreaking havoc on valuable crop fields. The most economically significant GR weed, GR fleabane is both challenging and expensive to manage.
Published in Weeds
Some Prairie farmers were fortunate enough to have good moisture conditions to band anhydrous ammonia or urea last fall to get a jump on spring seeding. But for the majority of farmers, dry conditions in many parts of the Prairies may mean adjustments to nitrogen (N) applications.
Keith Currie, president of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, says while the agricultural sector has a long history of learning and adapting to the variability of Canada’s weather and climate, global warming and climate change present a much more formidable challenge to agricultural production because of more frequent extreme weather events and changes to regional water cycles.
Published in Agronomy
Reducing natural habitats in order to create more acres of farmland may become a regretful practice with negative consequences – including reducing the yield potential of canola and other oilseeds, says Melanie Dubois, research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) from the Brandon, Man., Research and Development Centre. Dubois recently finished her second field season of a three-year project.
Published in Canola
Page 1 of 20

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine

Latest Events

'Soil Your Undies' experiment in Elora
Mon Jul 23, 2018 @10:00AM - 11:00AM
Intercropping Field Day
Tue Jul 24, 2018 @10:00AM - 05:00PM
Manitoba crops-a-PALOOZA
Wed Jul 25, 2018 @ 8:00AM - 05:00PM

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.