Diseases
The Grain Farmers of Ontario issued an open letter to producers on Nov. 9 in response to Ontario's outbreak of DON in grain corn.
Published in Corporate News
As of Nov. 9, 1,300 producers have called Agricorp to report damage to grain corn due to deoxynivalenol (DON). Agricorp is an Ontario organization delivering risk management programs to the agriculture industry and is currently asking its customers to collect and document DON samples, tests and rejections to quantify the loss and support any claims. 
Published in Harvesting
Mouldy corn can be harvested, cleaned, stored, used as feedstock for anaerobic biodigesters, sent to ethanol plants, burned or mowed and incorporated as corn residue.
Published in Harvesting
Ontario's 2018 Grain Corn Ear Mould and DON survey found 60 per cent of samples tested low for DON, a increase from last year. However, the Ontario grain industry is prepared and able to process high DON corn with minimal impact.
Published in Harvesting
The most significant variable associated with mycotoxin test results comes from incorrect sample collection or uneven distribution of infected kernels in a load. 
Published in Diseases
Visible symptoms of clubroot have been confirmed in 37 Saskatchewan canola fields across the northern agricultural regions to date.
Published in Diseases
Plant health partners in Canada, from industry associations to academia, come together to establish the Canadian Plant Health Council to collectively address evolving risks to plant and animal resources.
Published in Corporate News
Cultivar resistance is considered the most effective and practical approach for clubroot management on canola. However, almost all of the current cultivars were based on a single clubroot resistance (CR) gene, which can be eroded when the pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae changes in virulence.
Published in Canola
Clubroot continues to be a disease risk to canola crops across Alberta, with more than 2,700 clubroot-infested fields now confirmed, along with a few isolated cases in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Although good clubroot resistant (CR) varieties have been available for about 10 years, there are an increasing number of fields in Alberta where new strains of the pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae have overcome the resistance.
Published in Diseases
The fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, which causes stem rot, is a major economic disease in canola that impacts the crop across all of Canada’s growing regions.
Published in Diseases
The 2018 grain corn ear mould and vomitoxin (DON) survey found 60 per cent of Ontario grain corn samples tested low - less than two parts per million (ppm), for DON.
Published in Diseases
The Ontario Ministry of Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) is conducting its annual survey sampling grower corn fields to determine ear mould incidence and the occurence of mycotoxins in grain. 
Published in Diseases
First detected in Ontario canola in 2016, clubroot is an increasing concern for the province’s canola growers. A University of Guelph research group is a key player in Canadian research to manage this devastating disease and is advancing knowledge about Ontario’s clubroot situation.
Published in Diseases
Since the early 1990s, blackleg resistant canola varieties have been available in Western Canada, and have helped to prevent yield losses caused by the main races of the pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. But the disease is on the rise due to a shift in the races of the pathogen that has resulted in the loss of resistance in some canola varieties in some fields.
Published in Canola
The recent identification of a new midge in Prairie canola crops has led researchers to revisit previous detections of what was thought to be swede midge. Boyd Mori, a research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) in Saskatoon, thinks most of the suspected swede midge detections in Western Canada have likely been the new midge, which is closely related to swede midge. That’s good news, since swede midge can be a very serious canola pest, while this new midge seems to be much less harmful.
Published in Diseases
Wheat breeding has a long history in Canada, beginning in the late 1800s when researchers began looking at spring wheat varieties for Western Canada. The need at that time, in that region, was for an earlier maturing variety of wheat.
Published in Plant Breeding
Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease affecting yield and quality of wheat and other important cereal crops across Canada. Breeding for resistance continues to be a key strategy in the fight against FHB, and research scientists like George Fedak are helping to lead the way.
Published in Cereals
The pool of genetic diversity in a domesticated crop like barley is much shallower than in the crop’s wild relatives. So researchers sometimes bring individual genes from a wild cousin into the crop to add crucial traits. But plant breeder Duane Falk is tackling the problem from the opposite direction: he is re-domesticating wild barley lines.
Published in Cereals
As growers know, FHB fungi can produce toxins that limit the grain’s use for food and feed. The grain’s concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON), the most common FHB toxin, is the critical limiting factor for most buyers.
Published in Diseases
Manitoba Agriculture’s clubroot distribution map shows an increase in clubroot symptoms observed in central Manitoba.
Published in Canola
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