Diseases
Dry conditions across Ontario have amplified moisture stress, nutrient deficiency symptoms, insect feed and disease symptoms in soybeans, according to OMAFRA's latest field crop report. 
Published in Soybeans
A week of wild weather has provided moisture relief to many areas of the province, but strong winds and hail have damaged some fields. Overall, the condition of the majority of crops ranges from fair to excellent, according to Saskatchewan's Agriculture's weekly crop report
Published in Agronomy
The majority of crops are progressing well, but the cycle of high humidity and dry conditions have resulted in worsening topsoil moisture conditions, reduced hay yields and increased sightings of root rot due to excess moisture, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly crop report

The majority of crops are in good condition and at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Twenty per cent of the spring cereals are in the heading stage, while 45 per cent of the canola and mustard and 44 per cent of the pulse crops are flowering.

Overall, topsoil moisture conditions have slightly worsened in the past week, due to the warmer temperatures and lack of moisture. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as four per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate, 29 per cent short and five per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 52 per cent adequate, 32 per cent short and 13 per cent very short. Topsoil moisture remains in very short supply in many southwestern areas.

Haying continues, although there have been delays due to rain and high humidity. Hay yields so far are reported to be much lower than average and many pastures are expected to have significantly reduced carrying capacity heading into the summer. Pasture conditions are rated as six per cent excellent, 44 per cent good, 34 per cent fair, 13 per cent poor and three per cent very poor.

Producers are wrapping up in-crop herbicide applications in most areas and are applying fungicides when warranted. The majority of crop damage this past week was due to localized flooding, lack of moisture, strong winds and hail. Some crops are suffering from diseases such as root rot due to excess moisture. | READ MORE
Published in Agronomy
Across most of the Prairies, cereals grown in shortened crop rotations will continue to be vulnerable to Fusarium head blight (FHB) as a result of more severe FHB incidence in 2016, according to Alberta Agriculture and Forestry's update. 
Published in Diseases
Early season root rot has been reported in both soybeans and sunflowers, according to Manitoba Agriculture's Insect and Disease update. 
Published in Diseases
With high canola prices relative to other commodities, the temptation to run continuous canola is high. But does it really pay in the short term? A research study shows that net returns aren’t necessarily better, and that insect and disease pressures increase over time.
Published in Canola
Green seed in canola is a downgrading factor that causes more than $150 million in losses annually. But researchers at the University of Calgary hope to help reduce those losses with the identification of a gene that helps the de-greening process.
Published in Canola
The impacts of clubroot on susceptible canola cultivars are usually pretty obvious – the plants look drought-stricken and have large, irregular swellings (galls) on their roots. But the pathogen itself has remained somewhat enigmatic. Now a team of researchers mostly from Western Canada, led by Hossein Borhan and in collaboration with scientists from England and Poland, has sequenced the clubroot genome. This work is generating insights into the pathogen and how it functions, and is providing a springboard for future advances in clubroot management.
Published in Agronomy
AgriBrink Ltd. and Farm Health Monitor Ltd. are among the 26 companies selected to receive grants of up to $30,000 in the latest round of the program funded through the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario).
Published in Corporate News
Highlights from Ontario Field Crop News' latest crop report include stripe rust found in the St. Mary's area, excessive rainfall resulting in some re-planting, edible bean planting at 30 per cent complete and winter wheat, canola and forages progressing well. | READ MORE
Published in Seeding/Planting
Whether or not to use fungicide at the same time as herbicide to protect from blackleg infection depends on a number of factors. The most recent disease update from Manitoba Agriculture includes questions growers should ask themselves when it comes to protecting their crop.
Published in Diseases
Flea beetles and cutworms continue to be the main insect concerns, according to John Gavloski in the latest Manitoba Insect and Disease Update. 

Foliar insecticide applications are occurring in many canola fields and some second insecticide applications to control flea bettles. There are also more reports of reseeding of canola because of feeding by flea beetles, particularly in the Southwest and Central regions.

There are also reports of insecticide use for cutworm in oats, wheat, canola, corn, sunflower and dry beans. Now is the time for cutworm feeding to intesify as cutworms get larger and their feeding more noticeable. Some of the heaviest feeding seems to be in the Central region and southwest Manitoba. 

The update also warns of early season infection of blackleg in canola, especially if the crop endured damage from hail, wind, frost or insect feeding. The question for growers is whether or not to use fungicide at the herbicide timing to protect their crop from blackleg infection. The update cites studies that show early fungicide application can reduce disease and increase yield. However, the growing conditions present in the studies are specific and there are other factors to consider. | READ MORE

Published in Insect Pests
Seedling disease is showing up in early planted soybeans, and flea beetles are a concern in many canola fields, according to John Gavloski in the latest Manitoba Insect and Disease Update. 
Published in Insect Pests
Call Susie Li a dreamer, but the researcher at Alberta Innovates Technology Futures at Vegreville, Alta., has developed a way for a tiny nano-biosensor to monitor sclerotinia spore levels in canola and alert a grower with a telephone call.
Published in Diseases
Those humble wild sunflowers you see growing along prairie roadsides are key weapons in the fight against sclerotinia in sunflower crops. Through a long, complex process, researchers are transferring resistance genes from wild species into cultivated sunflower and gradually upping the crop’s ability to fight off this pathogen.
Published in Other Crops
Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Agriculture will be conducting a more extensive clubroot survey this year to try and get ahead of the soil-borne disease. Penny McCall, executive director of the ministry’s crops and irrigation branch says they will be surveying 1,800 fields across the province’s northern and eastern crop districts. | READ MORE
Published in Canola
Although oats are less susceptible than other cereals to Fusarium head blight (FHB), this disease can impact oat yield and quality when conditions strongly favour the disease – as they did on the Prairies in 2016. So, researchers are working to better understand FHB in oat, to develop oat varieties with even stronger FHB resistance, and to help ensure the grain remains safe for humans and livestock.
Published in Diseases
The fungal disease Verticillium longisporum was first detected in Canada in a canola field on a farm in Manitoba in 2014. The results of a subsequent national survey led by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and released in 2016, detected the presence of the pathogen V. longisporum in varying levels in six provinces in Canada: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec.
Published in Diseases
In Canada, the Global Institute for Food Security (GIFS) at the University of Saskatchewan conducts research into transformative innovations in agriculture in both the developed and the developing world.
Published in Plant Breeding
All plants need nitrogen. While healthy bacteria can occur naturally in the soil, especially in fields that have grown nitrogen-fixing crops like soybeans in the past, sometimes nature requires a little help for increased production.
Published in Inoculants
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