Diseases
The Ontario Ministry of Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) is conducting its annual survey sampling grower corn fields to determine ear mould incidence and the occurence of mycotoxins in grain. 
Published in Diseases
Since the early 1990s, blackleg resistant canola varieties have been available in Western Canada, and have helped to prevent yield losses caused by the main races of the pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. But the disease is on the rise due to a shift in the races of the pathogen that has resulted in the loss of resistance in some canola varieties in some fields.
Published in Canola
The recent identification of a new midge in Prairie canola crops has led researchers to revisit previous detections of what was thought to be swede midge. Boyd Mori, a research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) in Saskatoon, thinks most of the suspected swede midge detections in Western Canada have likely been the new midge, which is closely related to swede midge. That’s good news, since swede midge can be a very serious canola pest, while this new midge seems to be much less harmful.
Published in Diseases
Wheat breeding has a long history in Canada, beginning in the late 1800s when researchers began looking at spring wheat varieties for Western Canada. The need at that time, in that region, was for an earlier maturing variety of wheat.
Published in Plant Breeding
Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a serious disease affecting yield and quality of wheat and other important cereal crops across Canada. Breeding for resistance continues to be a key strategy in the fight against FHB, and research scientists like George Fedak are helping to lead the way.
Published in Cereals
The pool of genetic diversity in a domesticated crop like barley is much shallower than in the crop’s wild relatives. So researchers sometimes bring individual genes from a wild cousin into the crop to add crucial traits. But plant breeder Duane Falk is tackling the problem from the opposite direction: he is re-domesticating wild barley lines.
Published in Cereals
As growers know, FHB fungi can produce toxins that limit the grain’s use for food and feed. The grain’s concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON), the most common FHB toxin, is the critical limiting factor for most buyers.
Published in Diseases
Manitoba Agriculture’s clubroot distribution map shows an increase in clubroot symptoms observed in central Manitoba.
Published in Canola
A major research project called SoyaGen is tapping into the power of genomics to really boost Canadian soybean breeding advances.
Published in Soybeans
Fortenza insecticide is now registered as a soybean seed treatment for control of below-ground pests such as European chafer, June beetle, wireworm and seed corn maggot, according to a release by Syngenta Canada. 
Published in Insecticides
Recent rains result in increased risk for root rot, as well as black point or smudge in harvested wheat. Winter wheat yield reports are below average, but yield and quality are better than expected considering the heat and moisture stress endured throughout the season in Ontario, according to OMAFRA's latest crop report. 
Published in Diseases
Prairie cereal growers in warm, humid zones will be on the lookout for Fusarium outbreaks in the flowering stage. 
Published in Diseases
Blackleg disease is on the rise. Research scientist Gary Peng, with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) in Saskatoon, says tighter canola rotations have meant an increase in virulent races of the blackleg pathogen.
Published in Diseases
Dry conditions across Ontario have amplified moisture stress, nutrient deficiency symptoms, insect feed and disease symptoms in soybeans, according to OMAFRA's latest field crop report. 
Published in Soybeans
A week of wild weather has provided moisture relief to many areas of the province, but strong winds and hail have damaged some fields. Overall, the condition of the majority of crops ranges from fair to excellent, according to Saskatchewan's Agriculture's weekly crop report
Published in Agronomy
The majority of crops are progressing well, but the cycle of high humidity and dry conditions have resulted in worsening topsoil moisture conditions, reduced hay yields and increased sightings of root rot due to excess moisture, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly crop report

The majority of crops are in good condition and at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Twenty per cent of the spring cereals are in the heading stage, while 45 per cent of the canola and mustard and 44 per cent of the pulse crops are flowering.

Overall, topsoil moisture conditions have slightly worsened in the past week, due to the warmer temperatures and lack of moisture. Provincially, topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as four per cent surplus, 62 per cent adequate, 29 per cent short and five per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent surplus, 52 per cent adequate, 32 per cent short and 13 per cent very short. Topsoil moisture remains in very short supply in many southwestern areas.

Haying continues, although there have been delays due to rain and high humidity. Hay yields so far are reported to be much lower than average and many pastures are expected to have significantly reduced carrying capacity heading into the summer. Pasture conditions are rated as six per cent excellent, 44 per cent good, 34 per cent fair, 13 per cent poor and three per cent very poor.

Producers are wrapping up in-crop herbicide applications in most areas and are applying fungicides when warranted. The majority of crop damage this past week was due to localized flooding, lack of moisture, strong winds and hail. Some crops are suffering from diseases such as root rot due to excess moisture. | READ MORE
Published in Agronomy
Across most of the Prairies, cereals grown in shortened crop rotations will continue to be vulnerable to Fusarium head blight (FHB) as a result of more severe FHB incidence in 2016, according to Alberta Agriculture and Forestry's update. 
Published in Diseases
Early season root rot has been reported in both soybeans and sunflowers, according to Manitoba Agriculture's Insect and Disease update. 
Published in Diseases
With high canola prices relative to other commodities, the temptation to run continuous canola is high. But does it really pay in the short term? A research study shows that net returns aren’t necessarily better, and that insect and disease pressures increase over time.
Published in Canola
Green seed in canola is a downgrading factor that causes more than $150 million in losses annually. But researchers at the University of Calgary hope to help reduce those losses with the identification of a gene that helps the de-greening process.
Published in Canola
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