Business/Policy
Richardson International Limited is adding another crop inputs location to its growing network of retail crop inputs centres across the Prairies. The company recently announced the acquisition of Bestland Air Ltd., an independent crop inputs retailer located near Starbuck, Man. The transaction closed on Dec. 8, 2017.

“This business is an excellent addition to our Richardson Pioneer network as it will be an extension of our full-service Richardson Pioneer Ag Business Centre in Starbuck,” says Tom Hamilton, vice-president, Agribusiness Operations. “It will provide us with additional capacity and enhance our ability to continue providing local producers with leading seed, fertilizer and crop inputs technologies.”

Richardson is focused on building its crop inputs network across Western Canada through both acquisitions and new builds. The company acquired 10 retail crop inputs locations from CHS Canada in October and purchased two independent, full-service retail crop inputs centres in Vermilion and Forestburg, Alta., last summer.

Richardson is also expanding its network by building new crop inputs facilities in strategic locations across the Prairies. Two new crop inputs centres opened in Elrose, Sask., last summer and in Pasqua, Sask., in November. A third new crops inputs facility is currently under construction in Wakaw, Sask., and will be open for business in 2018.
Published in Corporate News
Grain Growers of Canada (GGC) is calling on the Senate of Canada to pass Bill C-49, The Transportation Modernization Act as quickly as possible. This Bill will give grain farmers and shippers important tools that will create a more accountable, fair and efficient rail transportation system. Growers are concerned that without these powers in place, there will be increasing delays and costs in getting grain to market.

“International customers are always looking to Canada for our top-quality grains and oilseed products, but over the years our reputation as a reliable supplier has been put into question, in large part due to our rail logistics system,” said Jeff Nielsen, GGC president. “We are anxious to have the C-49 measures in place as they will not only give us some competitive options but will allow shippers to hold the railways accountable when they fail to meet their contractual service obligations.”

The grains sector in Western Canada is now into its most critical time as the value chain works together to move another very large crop. “We are already experiencing signs of deteriorating service,” continued Nielsen. “With car order fulfilments decreasing, growers are becoming increasingly concerned we will find ourselves in another devastating grain backlog like we experienced in 2013-14.”

To rebalance the relationship temporary measures were put in place to address the 2013-14 grain crisis, including extended interswitching distances up to 160km. Those provisions expired in August 2017 and shippers have been left with no meaningful tools to secure accountable, fair and efficient service from the railways. Bill C-49 contains legislative amendments that will give shippers permanent tools, including access to reciprocal penalties, long haul interswitching and improved data collection and transparency.

“The measures contained in C-49 have been a long time coming for the grain sector,” said Art Enns, GGC Vice-President. “We cannot afford another year without provisions in place that are critical to rebalancing commercial relationships and creating a more competitive and efficient rail environment. Grain farmers across Canada urge the Senate to do the right thing and pass Bill C-49 as quickly as possible.”
Published in Storage & Transport
FarmLead, North America's largest and fastest growing online grain marketplace, recently announced the launch of GrainCents, a digital subscription service that provides specific recommendations to North American farmers on when to sell, hold and/or hedge in various market conditions to improve balance sheets, operations, and grain marketing schedules. GrainCents also educates farmers by providing expert insights on global market conditions and how they impact farm operations for specific crops.

"FarmLead's blog is a great hub for grain marketing information," said Chad Sebulsky of Sebulsky Farms. "Over the past few months, I have grown to trust the insight that Brennan Turner provides on a daily basis, allowing me to sell my wheat, barley and canola at the right time."

Time-constrained North American farmers fulfill a variety of roles on the farms, one of which includes marketing and selling their grain. Many turn to outside consultants who may or may not operate on their schedule, while others look to market analysts who fail to cover all the supply-and-demand factors required for effective grain marketing.

In contrast, GrainCents offers a cost-effective solution to make sense of what is really moving the markets for 12 crops grown in North America, including corn, soybeans, three wheat varieties, and canola.

GrainCents is built on FarmLead President & CEO Brennan Turner's accurate track record of 93 per cent right calls of when to sell, hold or hedge grain over the past two years. The cost for the annual GrainCents subscription ranges from $250 to $450 per crop, and discounted packages for multiple crops are available.

"Too often I hear about 'just-in-time' grain marketing; hoping and wishing for better prices," Turner said. "We think that knowing the market you're in, and the main factors influencing it, can generate a successful grain marketing plan. GrainCents is the first fully transparent tool that weighs all the factors to help farmers make the smartest and timeliest decision when selling grain."

The addition of GrainCents is another step in the company's mission to provide value throughout the grain marketing lifecycle of the North American farmer. From market analysis, grain testing and pricing recommendations, to accessing more qualified buyers and ensuring the best possible price for grain, farmers on FarmLead receive more value than any other grain selling platforms.

For more information, please visit: https://farmlead.com/graincents.
Published in Corporate News
New Holland announced that it has enabled wireless data transfer capabilities between its PLM Connect Precision Land Management system and six more major service providers, including popular farm management system, AgDNA.

With this newly introduced capability, users of PLM Connect will now have the ability share their agronomic data from their management portal directly to and from these third-party providers.

Depending on the services offered by the service provider, these producers may elect to share yield data, guidance line patterns and much more from any computer or tablet connected to the Internet. In return, the service providers can analyze the data provided by producers and send prescriptions and analysis as a result.

“Data is one of the most valuable commodities our customers have,” said Luke Zerby Brand marketing manager for New Holland. “Being able to effectively and quickly utilize that data can mean the difference between profit and loss. New Holland continues to add connections with third parties like these to ensure our producers have access to the resources they desire to optimize their operations.”

More information on the connected service providers is below:

AgDNA
AgDNA is a cloud-based mobile application and web platform designed to empower farmers with the ability to make informed decisions about their entire farming operation. The comprehensive enterprise-level farm management platform includes farm planning, inventory management, agronomic insights, equipment optimization and field level financial reports. AgDNA provides actionable insights to increase yield, lower operating costs and maximize farm profitability on every acre.

AgReliant Advantage Acre
Advantage Acre is a web-based digital platform from AgReliant Genetics that provides a comprehensive suite of technologies that bring together three foundational elements of farming: seed, soil and weather. The platform combines AgReliant Genetics’ expansive knowledge of its seed products with innovative functional soil mapping technology, advanced weather forecasting, variable rate planting and nitrogen recommendations to provide field-by-field, acre-by-acre seed recommendations that maximize yield potential. The platform allows farmers to record and access information to better plan for the season ahead, apply the plans they have created in-season, and assess their performance at the end of the year.

AgWorks
AgWorks, a provider of top-tier agronomy software tools for 25 years, offers AgOS, a comprehensive agronomy solution. AgOS connects operations, crop planning, scouting, mapping, compliance and grower access into one operational system to drive continuity, accuracy and efficiency. The company also offers a HighQ Analytics and Decision Support system to manage data and provide actionable reports that enable growers to make more profitable and environmentally sound decisions.

FieldReveal 
FieldReveal is a turnkey precision farming and data management system designed specifically for ag retailers to work with growers to maximize profitability by creating best management decisions across every acre. This is done by being built on a cloud-based software package with capabilities that include patented processes for VR fertility and seed management, multi-hybrid seed management, wireless transfer, and much more. With 15 years of experience, FieldReveal makes it easy for agronomists to help growers feel confident about each year’s crop input decisions.

GROWMARK 
FS Advanced Information Services (AIS) is a web-enabled and OnSite-connected platform that the GROWMARK System utilizes for site-specific recommendations, management, and analysis. GROWMARK is an agricultural cooperative providing agronomy, energy, facility planning, and logistics products and services, as well as grain marketing and risk management services in more than 40 states and Ontario, Canada. GROWMARK owns the FS trademark, which is used by affiliated member cooperatives.

I.F.A.R.M. 
I.F.A.R.M. (Information for Agricultural Resource Management) provides a customized cloud-based precision ag software for managing farm operations. Including data management, field mapping, data analysis, fertilizer applications / recs, zone management, and soil / plant-tissue work orders and dispatch. It currently serves retail fertilizer dealers, independent retail dealers, co-ops, consultant & agronomy groups, farm managers, growers, and ag educational facilities.

Zerby added that the brand planned to establish and announce a number of similar data sharing agreements throughout the year and beyond.

“New Holland is working diligently to add these data-sharing connections as part of our open architecture with PLM. More API’s will be added in an ordered based on impact for the NAFTA customer base.”

More information on New Holland can be found at www.newholland.com/na
Published in Corporate News
The Agricultural Adaptation Council (AAC) is pleased to announce the 2017-2018 board of directors. The election for the new board took place at the 22nd Annual General Meeting held on December 7, 2017 in Guelph, Ont.

The AAC’s 64 member organizations annually elect 16 directors to serve on the AAC board. They are joined by two, non-voting, liaisons from the federal and provincial government. The AAC board has approved over $276 million in federal and provincial funding to support over 3,450 projects since 1995. READ MORE
Published in Corporate News
Messages and the medium must change to improve food literacy among future consumers, according to a new study released today by the Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA). The Food Literacy Attitude and Awareness Research Project set out to gain a better understanding of the current state of food literacy among Ontario consumers, and use the insights to guide future programs, resources and information.

OFA, together with an advisory committee including the Nutrition Resource Centre – Ontario Public Health Association, Ontario Home Economics Association, AgScape, and Farm and Food Care Ontario, surveyed three distinct consumer groups to measure their level of food literacy and provide baseline information, with support from the Government of Ontario in partnership with the Greenbelt Fund.

“We wanted to gauge the current knowledge level of parents with kids at home, teenagers and early millennials,” says Keith Currie, OFA president. “Food literacy is a very timely topic, and one that needs more attention and support because it is so closely tied with public health. We need to understand what consumers – both current and future – are aware of so we can accurately focus resources and information in the future. This study provides an insightful starting point.”

The project included two in-person focus groups to gather qualitative information on food literacy that was used to gather 1,003 online surveys for quantitative information on local food, meal planning, purchasing, preparation and consumption in the home, and information sources used by consumers.

According to the study results, the current ways of reaching teenagers with food literacy messages are neither effective nor impactful. Dietitians generally target their messages to parents and should revise their messages and focus to target teens directly. Most food skills are learned at home, passed from parent to child, making it vital that parents are comfortable with food preparation and have a good knowledge and understanding of health and nutrition.

Other study highlights include:
  • Nearly 25 per cent of all respondents didn’t know any of the food groups
  • Millennials seek health and nutrition information from a wide variety of sources, compared to other consumer groups surveyed
  • Less than 50 per cent of parents surveyed know the safe cooking temperatures for a variety of meat and poultry items
  • Overall, there is a clear understanding of local food products but not of farming practices or food production
  • Local food knowledge does not differ significantly depending on where the respondents live (rural, urban, suburban)
“The information we gather now serves as a guide for OFA and other partners to identify future needs, including public policy, to develop stronger food literacy components in our curriculum and through other programs and resources,” says Currie. “We are already working with a registered dietician to develop a meal plan for teenagers to help them understand how to put together a properly, balanced meal. This will be a great addition to our www.SixbySixteen.me program.”

“It is important for Ontarians to know about where the food on their plate comes from and the great benefits our agriculture sector brings to the economy,” said Edward McDonnell, CEO of the Greenbelt Fund. “These insights provide an important benchmark to measure progress on local food literacy, and I am confident that our ongoing work with the OFA and other farm organizations will continue to move the needle, particularly among younger Ontarians.”

The complete Food Literacy Attitude and Awareness Research Project report is available at www.ofa.on.ca.
Published in Consumer Issues
Prairie farmers continue to insure their crops for hail damage at near record levels. 2017 recorded one of the lightest hail claim years since 2009. Claims produced insurance payouts of $96 million on just over 8,600 claims in Western Canada. Producer premiums totaled just over $286 million for an industry loss ratio of 33.8 per cent.

Dry spring conditions, combined with 2016 unharvested acres, and some continued industry rate declines resulted in a five per cent decrease in producer paid premiums for 2017.

With the lack of moisture much of the western prairies received little in the way of convective storm activity resulting in hail losses.

Hardest hit was Manitoba with a loss ratio of 45.9 per cent, a figure still well below a record 2016 loss ratio of 158.9 per cent. Alberta followed with a loss ratio of 33.7 per cent, compared to 83.6 per cent in 2016. Saskatchewan reported a 30 per cent loss ratio compared to 73 per cent in 2016.

Another year of contrasts and challenges emerged for producers. Dry conditions followed what looked to be a promising planting season. The dry conditions were wide spread across the western prairies. While welcomed by some after excess moisture in 2016, record and near record dry was reported through a large portion of Saskatchewan and parts of Alberta. Manitoba producers appeared to receive more timely precipitation. In spite of the dry conditions producers were presently surprised come harvest with yield and quality.

The storm season was spread across mostly July and August. All months of June thru October reported hail, however all months showed a decrease in storm frequency from the five year average. Claim frequency or claim to policy ratio was down about 30 per cent from the five year average. Storm severity or average per claim was down about 16 per cent from the five year average.

Alberta hail claim payments decline 60 per cent from 2016

Alberta’s quiet storm activity resulted in lighter than average loss activity for the industry. The first storms were reported as early as May 13th. The dry southern Alberta crops advanced quickly with an early harvest ensuing. Areas of central and northern Alberta were still recovering from excess moisture and late seeding due to a carry-over of the 2016 harvest. This resulted in some of those areas having the current fall harvest delayed compared to their southern producers. Fall conditions allowed for nearly all crop to be harvested in 2017.

Early storms were localized to small areas. By mid-June larger more organized storms became prevalent for the summer hail season. Alberta’s most expensive storm date(s) were July 23rd costing companies over $19,000 per claim and July 27th damaging over 33,000 acres and costing in excess of $2.2 million.

Total hail payments were reported just over $25 million as compared to over $60 million in 2016. Storm severity decreased by about 25 per cent, while the storm frequency was down about 40 per cent from the five year average. The overall reported loss ratio was 33.7 per cent.

Total sums insured were down from 2016, with average charged rates showing a slight increase from 2016 after a less than stellar loss result last year. The decrease in sums insured resulted in a premium declined of four per cent.

Saskatchewan reported lower than average losses

The west central part of the province began the season with early moisture and delayed
seeding. The north east part of the province meanwhile still was trying to clean up 2016 harvest due to excess fall moisture and early winter. Meanwhile the southern part of the province awaited moisture to help start the crops.

The dry conditions gave way to some areas receiving timely mid-June moisture. Some southern areas not so lucky had spotty germination and continued drought concerns. Regardless most areas in the province produced average to above average crops with good quality.

Saskatchewan’s hail season began in early June with storms on the 2nd and 9th. Hail frequency was down about 44 per cent based on the five year average. The five year hail severity was decreased by roughly 10 per cent. Saskatchewan’s most expensive storm date(s) was July 20 and 21, costing companies $14.9 million on over 1100 claims. Total hail payments were just over $48 million compared to $125 million in 2016, a decrease of 61 per cent from a year earlier. The overall reported loss ratio was 30 per cent.

Provincial total sums insured decreased in 2017. The average charged rates also decrease for the year. Continued average industry loss results and competitive pressures likely contribute to the continued rate decline. These combined changes resulted in a five per cent decline to premiums for the year.

Manitoba recovers after a record hail year in 2016

Seeding was mostly complete by early June. Timely rains helped negate the dry conditions suffered in southern Saskatchewan and Alberta. With below average precipitation through June crops were still in good condition from spring moisture. Seasonal moisture provided great conditions throughout the growing season. This along with good harvest conditions provided Manitoba with average to above average yield and crop quality.

Manitoba’s hail season started in early June as well. With most crops still in the early stages minimal damage was recorded. The results from hail damage in Manitoba mirrored her sister prairie provinces. Manitoba’s most expensive hail day(s) appear to be July 21 and 22 costing companies over $11,000 per claim.

Hail frequency was down about 19 per cent from the five year average. Claim Severity was down about 17 per cent from the five year average. Total hail payments were just over $23 million compared to over $74 million in 2016. 2017 reported a stellar loss ratio of 46 per cent, compared to last year’s record 158 per cent loss ratio.

Total provincial sums insured had a marginal increase of three pre cent. This could be contributed to the large hail loss last year. Average charged rates also saw a minimal increase, likely from the historic loss results in 2016. These two factors would help contribute to a six per cent increase in premium for the year.
Published in Corporate News
The Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, and the Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of International Trade, issued the following statement today on the export of Canadian pulses to India:

“The Government of Canada is deeply concerned and disappointed with the recent regulatory and tariff decisions made by the Government of India affecting Canadian pulse trade.

“We have been steadfast in our efforts to find a mutually acceptable way forward with the Government of India to provide stable, sustainable access for Canadian pulse exports to India.

“In addition to efforts by Government of Canada senior officials to seek a long-term solution, we have also been actively engaged with our counterparts directly, most recently during the Government of Canada’s mission to India by Ministers Champagne, Bains, and Garneau. Despite these efforts, progress has stalled and a solution to this important issue remains elusive.

“The most recent derogation for the fumigation of pulses expired on September 30, 2017 and, for the first time since 2004, a renewal of the extension has not been granted by the Government of India to Canada. Other trade partners have received extended derogations to December 31, 2017, indicating that India is applying discriminatory treatment to Canada.

“To this, on November 8, 2017, India announced a 50% tariff on dry pea imports from all countries, a decision that was made without advance notice.

“The Government of Canada stands ready to work constructively with the Government of India, in close consultation with the Canadian pulse industry, to resolve this issue and obtain a commercially viable solution, helping to ensure India’s long term food security.

“Canada is a safe and reliable global supplier of pulses, which account for a large share of Canada’s exports to India. In 2016, Canada’s exports of pulses, including dry peas, to India were worth over $1.1 billion and accounted for 27.5 percent of Canada's global pulse exports.”
Published in Imports/Exports
Argentina recently authorized the use of genetically modified soybean seeds resistant to herbicides other than glyphosate, as the European Union (EU) debates whether to extend the license of weed-killers containing the ingredient.

The EU debate comes amid concerns the active ingredient in Monsanto Co.'s popular weed-killer Roundup causes cancer. That has caused concern in the South American country, the number one exporter of soybean meal and soybean oil and number three raw soybean exporter, that its exports to the EU could be in jeopardy.

In a statement, the Agriculture Ministry said the SYN-000H2-5 seed needed different herbicides which had not raised health concerns around the world. Syngenta AG and Bayer AG had requested government approval for the seed. For the full story, click here.
Published in World Outlook
The bioeconomy is an exciting new frontier for Ontario agriculture, opening up new markets for farmers beyond food and feed to a vast array of industrial and consumer applications. The Government of Canada is committed to increasing demand for farm products, while helping agri-based businesses to be innovative and competitive in order to create well-paying jobs and find new export markets.

Member of Parliament Lloyd Longfield (Guelph), on behalf of Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister Lawrence MacAulay, recently announced an investment of $1 million to support start-up company Mirexus Biotechnologies to establish operations in Guelph and commercialize a new micro-filtration process that will directly benefit Ontario sweet corn growers.

The technology will help isolate glycogen – a key ingredient for personal care and cosmetic products, derived from sweet corn – using a Mirexus-patented process.

The glycogen product has an established global demand and these products will primarily be made for export. Mirexus Biotechnologies broke ground on Sept. 28 for their new plant in Guelph which will buy 4,500 more tonnes of corn from Ontario growers over the next 10 years.
Published in Corporate News
Versatility, durability and precision control – these terms accurately describe the new 2630 Series Disks and Vertical Tillage tools available from John Deere. Building on the solid performance of the 2620 Series tillage tools, John Deere brings greater control to light, medium and heavy-duty tillage operations.

The new 2630 Series implement lineup includes four distinct models: 2630 Disk, 2633 Disk, 2635 Disk and 2633 Vertical Tillage implement, each providing different levels of soil penetration, residue mixing and seedbed preparation.

According to Jarred Karnei, John Deere product marketing manager, the new 2630 Series tillage tools allow customers to match the right tool to their field and soil conditions while improving tillage performance with the latest in on-the-go precision control, thanks to TruSet Technology.

“TruSet gives operators fingertip control in making tillage depth and pressure adjustments while allowing them to accurately map and store depth, speed and down pressure information,” explains Karnei. “This gives them even more data when analyzing field and crop information that can be used for making better agronomic decisions.”

TruSet is included in base equipment on all 2630 Series implements, making depth and pressure adjustments quick and easy from the cab. Instead of up to 10 minutes needed for manual adjustments, operators can make precise changes to down pressure and depth in less than six seconds, with 0.1-inch depth adjustment and 0-900 psi down pressure on rolling baskets.

In addition, customers can select from either mechanical stabilizer wheels or TruSet hydraulic stabilizer wheels as an option to maintain more consistent depth control on rolling ground.

Other important features of the 2630 Series tillage tools include new extended-life bearings that provide greater durability and reliability with the ability to customize bearing maintenance based on soil and tillage conditions.

For heavy, wet or rocky soils, a knife-edge hydraulic rolling basket option is now available, in addition to traditional round-bar and flat-bar baskets.

The new 2630 Series Disks and Vertical Tillage implements come with radial tires on the mainframes (base equipment) and are optional on wing frames and stabilizers. Radial tires offer longer wear life while minimizing compaction due to their wider footprint and lower inflation pressures.

The 2630 Series models include the 2630 Disk, available in different working widths from 20 feet 9 inches to 49 feet 3 inches for lighter soils and seedbed preparation; the versatile 2633 Disk for either primary or secondary tillage up to 6 inches deep in 10 different widths and tillage configurations; and the primary tillage workhorse 2635 Disk that cuts 8 inches deep for maximum tillage and crop residue incorporation, available in five working widths and configurations.

“With field operating speeds up to 7 mph, the new 2630 Series tillage tools are designed to easily handle a wide variety of soil and residue conditions with unprecedented control, while providing years of reliable performance,” says Karnei.

For more information on the new 2630 Series Disks and Vertical Tillage tools, as well as the full line of John Deere tillage implements featuring TruSet Technology, contact your local John Deere dealer or visit www.JohnDeere.com/ag.
Published in Corporate News
AMVAC Chemical Corporation recently announced its new broad spectrum, low use rate corn herbicide, ImpactZ, has received federal registration from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ImpactZ herbicide will give growers a new safe and flexible solution for control of tough broadleaf and grass weeds - including glyphosate resistant species - in corn.

ImpactZ herbicide is registered for use in field corn, seed corn, popcorn and sweetcorn, with no restrictions on soil type, tank mix partners or insecticides. ImpactZ herbicide contains both Impact and Atrazine for highly effective control of grass and broadleaf weeds in corn.

"Impact herbicide has long provided value to corn growers as an excellent tool for weed resistance management," said Jim Lappin, AMVAC crop marketing manager, corn and soybeans. "ImpactZ herbicide provides safe, effective broad spectrum control in corn."

ImpactZ herbicide provides excellent control of tough grass weeds, including barnyardgrass, crabgrass and foxtails. It also controls a broad spectrum of broadleaf weeds, including waterhemp, palmer amaranth, lambsquarters and velvetleaf.

Corn growers will have flexibility to apply ImpactZ herbicide from weed emergence until corn reaches 12-inches in height as a sequential, early post or total post emergence program.

"AMVAC recognizes the challenges that corn growers face, and we work to deliver products that offer superior performance, crop safety and flexibility," said Lappin. "ImpactZ herbicide is an excellent tool to take on key grasses and broadleaf weeds that challenge yield potential in corn"

Individual state registrations for ImpactZ herbicide are pending. For more information on ImpactZ herbicide or additional AMVAC products and crop protection technologies, visit www.amvac-chemical.com.
Published in Herbicides
Trimble announced that it has added four new distributors to its Vantage network—a global network of independent experts that provide growers, advisors, retailers, co-ops and local OEM dealers with precision agriculture expertise for the entire farm.

The new Vantage distributors include: 
  • Vantage NSW: Vantage NSW in Australia was established from NFS Agribusiness—a Trimble authorized reseller since 2006. Located in the heart of the Liverpool Plains, Vantage NSW will provide Trimble total farm solutions throughout the central and northern parts of New South Wales, Australia.
  • Vantage Northeast Australia: Vantage NEA was established from Trimble's authorized reseller, BMS LaserSat, which has been in operation since 2001. Vantage NEA will provide Trimble total farm solutions throughout Northern New South Wales, Queensland, the Northern Territories and Tasmania, Australia.
  • Vantage Canada West: Vantage Canada West is a new authorized distributor with offices in Calgary, Alberta and Vancouver, British Columbia. Vantage Canada West will provide Trimble total farm solutions throughout Alberta and British Columbia.
  • Vantage Benelux: Vantage Benelux was established from Trimble's authorized reseller in the Benelux—Agrometius BV. With offices in Utrecht (The Netherlands) and Sint-Truiden (Belgium), Vantage Benelux focuses on Trimble total farm solutions including precision ag services for growers, contractors and crop advisors throughout the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg.
 For additional information about Vantage, visit: www.vantage-ag.com.
Published in Corporate News
The provincial government of New Brunswich is investing $500,000 in agricultural services equipment as part of the 2018-19 capital budget.

“Our staff works to support our farmers and agricultural producers,” said Agriculture, Mines and Rural Affairs Minister Andrew Harvey. “Making the right investment at the right time ensures that we will continue to be able to provide the efficient, high-quality services and support that producers rely on.”

Harvey visited the Potato Development Centre in Wicklow, where capital investments will allow for work such as replacing walls and cooling units on potato storage bins.

“This investment builds on investments announced last year to replace equipment at the Potato Development Centre,” said Harvey.

The department will also fund the purchase of veterinary field equipment and other equipment, including a new backup generator that will ensure the protection of pharmaceuticals and samples.

The funding is part of $28.1 million in spending on new initiatives identified in the capital budget. The government will invest $815.3 million in public infrastructure in 2018-19.

“Agriculture is a key sector of our economy and one that we have identified as a growth area under the Economic Growth Plan,” said Harvey. “Investments like those being made this year by the Department of Agriculture, Aquaculture and Fisheries ensure we can continue to provide farmers with the services they need and help support growth and innovation in the agricultural sector.”
Published in Corporate News
India’s decision to impose a steep tariff on pea imports could jeopardize $1 billion worth of pulse trading with Canada, which may cause farmers there to trim their pea acreage by nearly one-third.

Earlier this month, India imposed a 50 per cent import tax on peas, as pulse prices fell below their government-set support levels because of record output.

The duty is expected to lift domestic pulse prices and spur farmers in India, the world’s biggest buyer of pulses, to boost pulse plantings, reducing import requirements in 2018. READ MORE

Related: Statement by the Government of Canada on pulse exports to India
Published in World Outlook
Headquartered Sherwood Park, Alta., with additional facilities in Winnipeg, Man., and Grand Prairie, Alta., BioVision Seed Research Ltd. is a leading seed, grain and soil testing laboratory serving the agricultural markets in Western Canada and beyond. The company offers testing across a broad variety of crops, supported by its fully-accredited experts and laboratories. READ MORE
Published in Corporate News
On November 15, the Climate Corporation, a subsidiary of Monsanto Company, announced a partnership with Deveron UAS Corp., that will deliver farmers advanced aerial imagery data combined with powerful analytics through the Climate Corporation’s industry-leading Climate FieldView™ digital agriculture platform. The addition of Deveron supports Climate’s commitment to deliver a true digital ag ecosystem where farmers can access a broad, interconnected set of tools, services and data to optimize all of their farm management decisions.

“As remote sensing through advanced imagery continues its fast-paced development, drones are increasingly playing an important role to help farmers gain deeper insights into crop performance at scale,” said Mark Young, chief technology officer for The Climate Corporation. “Deveron has built a broad network of drones and sensors across North America to provide farmers with more data solutions to manage field variability, and we look forward to working with them to equip more farmers with data-rich imagery insights to make the best decisions for their operations.”

Based in Canada, Deveron is a leading full-service enterprise drone data company with a growing fleet of drones that can each conduct five to eight flights per day to collect, analyze and deliver farmers data-driven insights to help them make more informed decisions, reduce costs and increase yields. Deveron services are currently offered to farmers across core growing regions of Canada, and the company will be expanding its capabilities to the U.S. Corn Belt in the near-term.

During the 2017 growing season, Deveron and Climate completed a successful pilot program in Ontario, allowing farmers to visualize Deveron imagery within their Climate FieldView account. For the 2018 growing season, this partnership will enable aerial imagery data to seamlessly flow into a farmer’s Climate FieldView account at the farmer’s request, allowing them to experience deeper analysis of how their crops are performing in-season, alongside important field data layers such as planting and yield data. Recently, Climate announced the expansion of the Climate FieldView platform into Western Canada, with the platform on nearly one million acres in Eastern Canada.

“The Climate Corporation’s Climate FieldView platform aligns closely with our mission of delivering farmers a simple data collection solution, coupled with advanced analytics, to help farmers more precisely monitor their crops,” said David MacMillan, president and chief executive officer for Deveron. “Partnering with the Climate FieldView platform will further our ability to bring low cost, high-resolution imagery to more farmers so they can zero in on exactly what’s happening in their fields and gain actionable insights to help them achieve the highest return on investment.”

The Climate FieldView platform already offers advanced satellite imagery tools to help farmers protect their crops by identifying issues in the field before they impact yield. Innovative aerial imagery technologies like Deveron can provide farmers imagery at a higher resolution and frequency than satellite imagery, delivering on-demand information that can be used in digital ag tools to help farmers make more informed, data-driven agronomic decisions.

In 2016, The Climate Corporation announced the extension of the Climate FieldView platform and has since announced a variety of partnerships, including several advanced aerial imagery providers. Climate’s platform strategy unlocks a stronger and quicker path to market for third-party ag innovators, simplifying the complex digital ag landscape for farmers and making it easier for other innovators to bring valuable new technologies to farmers faster. Launched in 2015, the Climate FieldView platform is on more than 120 million acres with more than 100,000 users across the United States, Brazil and Canada. It has quickly become the most broadly connected platform in the industry and continues to expand into new global regions. Earlier this week, the company announced the pre-commercial launch of the Climate FieldView platform into regions of Europe.

As innovation in the digital agriculture space continues to accelerate rapidly around the globe, Climate continues to explore partnership opportunities to provide farmers with the insights they need to improve their productivity. If you are interested in partnering with The Climate Corporation, please visit www.climate.com/partners.

For more information about the Climate FieldView platform in Canada, contact Climate Support at 1.888.924.7475 or visit www.climatefieldview.ca. For more information about Deveron, visit www.deveronuas.com.

Published in Corporate News
The Canadian Grain Commission has launched a weekly statistical report on the allocation of producer cars. The publication of these statistics enhances the transparency of commercial grain handlings and supports the marketing of Canadian grain. The report is available on both the Canadian Grain Commission's web site and the Government of Canada's Open Data site and will be updated weekly.

Each week's publication reflects the cumulative number of producer cars allocated from the start of the crop year to the end of the shipping week. Reports within the publication break down the allocation numbers by the type of grain shipped, province of origin, and the grain's destination.

By making data such as this available publicly, the Canadian Grain Commission is supporting the Government of Canada's commitment to making data open and available to all Canadians.

Previously, statistics about producer railway cars were only available via email. They were distributed for free, but only went to a small number of stakeholders. Not all stakeholders were aware they could receive these reports, which didn't align with the Government of Canada's policy on open data.

The Canadian Grain Commission will now be publishing producer railway car statistics online to align with the Government of Canada's open data policy and to make these statistics available to all stakeholders.

Because the Canadian Grain Commission is publishing its producer railway car statistics online in more accessible formats, users will be able to compile the data to meet their specific needs.

Rather than using the categories wheat, durum, oats, barley, rye, flaxseed, canola and other to display grain movement by grain type, the new online content doesn't use an "other" category. Instead, statistics are displayed by grain type, even if the number of railway cars shipping that grain type is relatively low.

Also, the destination category now includes producer railway cars going into the licensed Canadian system (terminal and process elevators by region); the unlicensed Canadian system (by western or eastern region; processors; container facilities; seed or feed facilities); United States; and Mexico.

The online statistical reports include:
  • Glossary
  • Summary – cumulative and weekly totals by grain type and cumulative totals by country and grain
  • Cumulative by province and by grain
  • Cumulative by destination

History of producer railway car statistics
Producer railway car statistics have been published since the 1910 to 1911 crop year. Each year, producer railway car statistics (referred to back then as platform loadings) appeared in the Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce Part V Statistics.

In the 1942 to 1943 crop year, the Canadian Grain Commission began publishing weekly producer railway car statistics as part of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada Visible Supply of Canadian Grain report. Eventually, this report became Grain Statistics Weekly which is published weekly online.

The Canadian Grain Commission prepares 3 railway car statistical reports: weekly, monthly and annual. The weekly report is one page and includes cumulative data by type of grain and a weekly summary of the number of railway cars by port. The monthly report and the annual report are made up of 5 tables of producer railway car shipments as follows: by grain; by province and grain; by train run; by train run and grain; and by destination.
Published in Corporate News
Despite being at opposite ends of the planet, Canada and Australia have long been soul sisters, But it’s in agriculture where the similarities come to the fore, with very similar commodity profiles, particularly for grain, dairy and protein.

And despite very different target markets, trade agreements and government attitudes, each country’s agricultural communities are after one thing — a profitable and expanding appetite for their produce. | READ MORE
Published in World Outlook
Several efforts are underway to develop new tools and management strategies for blackleg disease in canola. Severe epidemics of blackleg can result in significant yield losses. Researchers have developed a new blackleg yield loss model for canola and an associated set of guidelines and recommendations for farmers and industry to help understand the economic impacts of this significant disease.
Published in Canola
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