Top Crop Manager

Features Agronomy Soybeans
Soybean growers may have window on extending season

BASFAug. 2, 2011 -Soybean growers in Ontario still have time to counteract a delayed growing season. In the coming days, growers can try a relatively new strategy with the goal of extending the plant’s growth by applying a fungicide to alleviate disease pressure and boost stress tolerance, both of which are key features for increased yield potential at harvest.


August 2, 2011
By BASF/Top Crop Manager

Topics

Aug. 2, 2011 -Soybean growers in Ontario still have time to counteract a delayed growing season. In the coming days, growers can try a relatively new strategy with the goal of extending the plant’s growth by applying a fungicide to alleviate disease pressure and boost stress tolerance, both of which are key features for increased yield potential at harvest.

BASF 
  

In many parts of Ontario, high heat and low rainfall throughout June and July have increased stress on the developing plants, which can seriously impact yield potential.

Until about August 7th (depending on their planting dates), growers will have an optimal application window to apply fungicide to early soybeans at the pin-bean stage. This advice comes from Richard Anderson of BASF Canada. "Soybean planting was especially delayed this spring due to wet conditions. Applying a fungicide during the coming days can help prolong the growing cycle for the bean to allow the plant to prevent early leaf drop well-into the season."

The timing is right for such an application, when the soybean plant is metabolizing and getting ready to set seed. According to research by BASF, applying a fungicide can provide an added benefit by increasing the plant’s stress tolerance, with the goal of seeing greener leaves and stronger stems.

In more than 100 trials since 2005, Headline has performed well in demonstrating yield advantages on soybeans, with an average increase of at least three bushels per acre.

Custom applicator Brad Fletcher of Fletcher Farms, has noticed an uptake in fungicide spraying on soybeans in Southwestern Ontario. On average Fletcher sprays 25,000 acres per year from his Komoka, Ontario operation. Since 2009, he estimates there has been a 30 percent growth in fungicide spraying on soybeans, with many growers reporting a significant yield advantage.

"Most farmers have told me they’re getting three to five bushels more per acre," he says, adding, "Others are just starting to try it for the first time. I think they’re trying to find out what the results will be."