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Removal of KVD a positive step

The announcement by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada removing kernel visual distinguishability (KVD) as a requirement for western wheat variety registration has the support of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association.


February 14, 2008
By Canadian Cattlemen's Association

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February 11, 2008


Calgary, AB – The Canadian Cattlemen's Association (CCA) supports the announcement by the Honourable Gerry Ritz, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food to fully remove kernel visual distinguishability (KVD) as a requirement for western wheat variety registration.


"Wheat producers have been significantly impacted by the restrictions KVD has imposed on them. KVD has also impacted the livestock sector by limiting the development and registration of new, higher-yielding varieties that are suitable for feed and biofuels at a time when the cost of feed is at an all-time high," states Hugh Lynch-Staunton, president of the CCA.

The CCA has advocated for the removal of this system for some time and recently completed a report titled Feed grains and forage research and commercialization in Canada (available on the CCA website www.cattle.ca) to investigate the current situation of feed grains and forage research and commercialization in Canada and factors that hinder competitiveness. The report indicated that the removal of KVD could significantly benefit the Canadian beef industry.


The report also indicated that the full removal of KVD would increase farm revenue by $60 to $200 million per year. In addition, plant breeders estimate that the value lost in existing varieties due to KVD restrictions is over $3.75 per tonne of production – equating to over $86 million per year.


"We applaud the decision by the federal government to remove KVD," says Lynch-Staunton. "This will give grain producers more choice in the variety of wheat they grow and these new varieties will provide benefits and options to the livestock sector. Until now, Canada was the only wheat-producing country that used KVD as a segregation tool and it is time we found an alternative if we are to remain competitive in the global market."