Corporate News
Farm Management Canada (FMC) and the Canadian Association of Diploma in Agriculture Programs (CADAP) have announced the selection of the winners of the 2016-2017 Excellence Award for Ag Students Competition. 

FMC and CADAP collected submissions from agricultural students across Canada and selected three winners who will receive scholarships towards furthering their education in agriculture. 

The award is designed to help students develop their communication skills by having the opportunity to voice their opinion on a on a subject related to farm management.

Students were asked to submit a multimedia presentation, a video, a Twitter chat, a blog or a Wiki, responding to the following question:

Certain segments of the general public question the way food is produced, and have misgivings about the use of new technology. What concrete steps would you, as a future member of the agricultural industry, propose to bridge the information and awareness gap?

This year's winners are:

Shanthanu Krishna Kumar
University of Guelph, Ont.

Jasmin Bautz
University of Saskatchewan, Sask.

William Lacasse
Institut de Technologie Agroalimentaire, campus de La Pocatière, Que.

Visit fmc-gac.com for more details on the winners and their competition entries.
A new winter wheat variety available for the first time in 2017 has out yielded all other varieties in the Ontario Cereal Crops Committee intensive trials in the last two years.

DS572SRW from Dow Seeds, a medium-tall awned soft red winter wheat variety that delivered an average of 110 per cent yield index over two years and 111 per cent in 2016, under intense management. The trials are a summary of results in areas 1 and 2, where 85 per cent of winter wheat is grown in the province.

DS572SRW can be purchased through the Dow Seeds Seed Partner network. Variety results can be viewed at GoCereals.ca
As a response to declining Bobolink and Eastern Meadowlark populations across the province, the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) has teamed up with researchers to launch a platform for farmers to record sightings of these two species at risk. GrassLander, a web-based map, gives Ontario farmers the ability to easily collect data on grassland bird behaviour. The data will contribute to a better scientific understanding of population trends that can help to inform science-based decision-making.

GrassLander is designed to be accessible to farmers, whether they’re out in the field or sitting at the kitchen table; the platform is optimized for computer, tablet or smart phone. Completely free, an online tutorial is available to take registrants through the steps of how to use GrassLander. All the information collected through GrassLander is secure; and to protect the privacy of GrassLander participants, the data is aggregated and only you are able to see your individual information.

GrassLander is ideal for producers who work agricultural land that includes pastures, meadows, native grasslands, restored grasslands, hayfields, or any other agricultural grassland spaces. Ontario producers and OSCIA have contributed to grassland bird conservation across the province in a variety of ways, including cost-share programs, research, education, and awareness initiatives; GrassLander is the latest addition to these valuable conservation efforts.

For more information on GrassLander or to get involved and start recording your sightings, visit ontariograsslander.ca.
OSCIA has announced the return of the BadgerWay Program for 2017, with applications now being accepted for eligible projects initiated on or after April 1, 2017. BadgerWay is part of the Species at Risk Partnerships on Agricultural Lands (SARPAL) initiative funded by Environment and Climate Change Canada, and supports farm habitat for the American badger, a species at risk in Ontario.

The BadgerWay Program provides funding opportunities for farmers in southwestern Ontario who wish to implement specific Best Management Practices (BMPs) that create new habitat or connect existing on farm habitat. Up to 75 per cent cost-share is available, to a maximum of $20,000 per farm business. The eligible BMPs are:

BMP 1: Establishment of perennial contour cropping or other in-field perennial grass strips
BMP 2: Tree and shrub planting
BMP 3: Native grassland restoration

For full program details or to apply, visit the OSCIA website.
Farming is a complex business, and keeping track of everything can sometimes be troublesome, if not a bit overwhelming.

With this in mind, Kingston-based software company Dragonfly IT developed Croptracker – a multi-faceted, cloud-based monitoring system designed to give fruit and vegetable growers real-time updates on their businesses.

“Croptracker offers an easy-to-use software package that monitors growing practices throughout the season,” said Matthew Deir, company founder. “Growers sign up for our system and can access all of their daily inputs from one central hub. It helps both traceability and cost saving.”

Croptracker highlights three key areas relevant to growers’ economic, environmental, and social sustainability, with food traceability taking the top spot, followed by operational costs and yield analysis.

The software itself is a consolidation of similar systems previously developed by Deir’s company, including Fruit Tracker, Apple Tracker, and Nursery Tracker. By combining these and several other systems, he says, Dragonfly IT has tried to make the software useful for all growers of all kinds.

The Croptracker cloud system allows growers to map how their crop is produced – what time it was planted, what inputs went into it, and so on – as well as where it came from. According to Deir, the software can literally trace each basket of product back to the field from which it was harvested, and potentially, even the person who harvested it.

Croptracker can also be used as a human resources interface, helping keep track of employee time and activity. There’s even a “punch clock” feature that can show growers who is doing what, for how long, and when. By being able to see how long it takes to perform different tasks, Deir said farmers can pinpoint where their costs are coming from, and if necessary, investigate why.

At the end of the growing season, the Croptracker system can also help monitor how good – or how bad – the harvest was at different times and from different parts of the farm. 

Approximately 1,000 farmers currently have access to the software for free (their producer associations buy the rights on their behalf), but individual growers can still access Croptracker on a pay-per-package basis.
Canadians now have access to a new level of personal emergency assistance and peace of mind, backed by an organization known for its expertise in finding and caring for critically ill and injured patients.
Most soybean and canola acres have been planted across the province, the majority of corn acres are in the V3 to V5 range, and much of the winter wheat crop has progressed beyond the post-flowering stage, according to the latest field report from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. Here's the breakdown by crop, below. 

Cereals

A large majority of the winter wheat crop has progressed beyond the post-flowering stage, and spraying for Fusarium head blight protection has been completed in many regions. Stripe rust is reported to be advancing in some areas in fields that did not receive a fungicide application. Significant yield loss can occur in cases where disease pressure is very high. Fields that received a T1 or T2 herbicide application are reported to be still holding disease pressure back well. True armyworm has been observed in some fields, but not at levels that have required control. Growers are encouraged to watch for head clipping feeding. Clover stands in winter wheat look excellent.

Corn
A large majority of the crop ranges from the V3-V5 stages. In general, growers and agronomists in many areas report that plant stands and crops look great. The exception is some localized, heavier textured soil regions where planting conditions of earlier planted corn may have been pushed, and replanting is occurring. Sidedressing has started or is well underway in many areas. OMAFRA recently completed it’s annual PSNT measurement survey from June 5-6. Average soil nitrate concentrations were 8.0 ppm which is lower than the 11-12 ppm range that has been observed over the past 5 years, suggesting N mineralization may be delayed from the cooler spring. The last year when PSNT survey values were in this range was 2011. With the recent warm weather, growers and applicators are reminded to check corn herbicide labels for maximum temperature restrictions. Of particular note, spraying of hormonal herbicides (ie. dicamba) should be avoided when temperatures are expected to be above 25 C during or after application.

Soybeans
With the exception of a few localized pockets where wet conditions have prevailed and planting continues, the majority of the soybean crop has been planted. The majority of the crop is in the 1-2 trifoliate stage. While stands look reasonable in many cases, some replanting continues in areas which received heavy rainfalls after planting where crusting was evident (particularly on fine textured soils), as well as areas where seedcorn maggot pressure was high and reduced populations. A uniform population as low as 100,000 plants per acre is still considered to provide good yield potential. Planting conditions have been reported to be good for late planted or replanted soybeans. Bean leaf beetles and soybean aphids have been observed in some fields, but at very low populations where control is not warranted. If soybeans are to be rolled after planting, rolling should occur at the 1st to 2nd trifoliate stage where plants are no longer brittle and susceptible to snapping, and ideally in the heat of the day when plants are flaccid. High stand losses can occur when plants are crisp and susceptible to snapping between the emergence and the 1st trifoliate stage. When in doubt, check plants after starting to roll and evaluate the stand for snapped plants which will no longer be viable.

Forages
Growers are reporting excellent yields for first cut hay. First cut hay timed for higher quality has neared completion in many regions. In general, there has been a good weather window for first cut in most parts of the province for both haylage/silage and dry hay, and harvest progressed quickly as a result.

Canola
While a small amount of canola planting was still being reported in some areas up until the end of last week, most planting is complete and the majority of crop across most growing regions is in the 3-4 leaf stage. Swede midge emergence was being reported as early as late May, and was occurring prior to Canola emergence in some fields. Growers are encouraged to place and monitor Swede Midge traps. The control threshold is 20 adults across all traps in a field, and has been met in some fields this spring. Flea beetle pressure has been apparent in some fields, with some control being warranted. As the crop progresses beyond the 3-4 leaf stage, Canola is generally able to keep ahead of feeding. While Cabbage Seed Pod weevil has been observed in some fields, it is not typically an issue until pod set starts.

Edible Beans
Edible bean planting is reported to be nearly complete with an estimated 95 per cent of intended acres planted. Planting progressed very quickly once started, with a large amount of crop planted in a relatively narrow window. Planting conditions have been reported to be good.
Three accomplished and talented women will join the prestigious Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame in 2017. Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki will be formally inducted into the national Hall of Fame at a ceremony November 30 in Calgary and hosted by the International Agriculture and Agri-Food Committee of the Calgary Stampede.
Vive Crop Protection is pleased to announce the recent appointment of Dr. Darren Anderson as President.
Choosing a successor is no easy task. While various family members may have ideas about who’s entitled to inherit the farm, the current owners may have very different ideas about who has the skills to keep the farm going in the long run. 

Throw blended families and in-laws into the mix and the question of succession may not have any clear-cut answers. And, in some instances, the best successor may come from outside the family. How does one decide? | READ MORE

A statement issued by the company On Tuesday, June 13th:

We regularly evaluate all aspects of our business. As part of these activities, we have recently taken the decision to exit the canola seed business. We are no longer selling or promoting our canola hybrids. We will, however, continue to support our existing canola seed portfolio through 2017 seeding and our programs and in-field product support, as per their terms and conditions. This decision is a business decision and we will work with all relevant parties to facilitate an orderly transition.
The Government of Canada is working with industry to help raise awareness, understanding and appreciation of agriculture among young Canadians. The agriculture and food sector is one of Canada's key growth industries and the opportunities for youth are endless.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Minister, Lawrence MacAulay, announced a one-year investment of over half a million dollars for Agriculture in the Classroom Canada to develop and deliver educational resources about the agriculture and agri-food sector to primary and secondary students across the country, and to promote career opportunities in the sector.  
Cereals
Current weather conditions are ideal for fusarium head blight development in winter wheat. Many wheat fields in Southwestern Ontario have applied a T3 fungicide to reduce their risk particularly if they are growing a FHB susceptible variety. T3 fungicide applications further east will begin this week and continuing into next week for Eastern Ontario. A number of fields saw increased stripe rust pressure over the weekend. Growers with fields that were a few days away from a T3 application opted to wait and spray for both stripe rust and fusarium at the T3 timing. Some fields received an early heading fungicide application if they were a week or more away from a T3 fungicide application and growing a stripe rust susceptible variety to reduce the impact from stripe rust. Those fields will then receive a second fungicide application at pollination for protection against fusarium if needed. There have been reports of leaf tip necrosis starting on the flag leaf and moving down in fields. This leaf tip necrosis is likely associated with a specific or group of disease resistant genes and is the plant’s response to the presence of disease such as stripe rust. The yield impact from this is minimal.

Early spring cereal fields are at tillering and continue to look good. All weed control applications should be wrapping up shortly.

Corn
Corn planting is essentially now complete. With the exception of corn silage or some growers in long season regions, most unplanted fields will now likely be switched to soybeans. If corn herbicides have been applied but corn could not be planted, work with your herbicide provider to determine next best cropping steps. Overall corn is progressing well with a large amount of crop at the 2-3 leaf growth stage, with early planted corn beyond that. Minimal corn replants have been reported to date. Some sidedressing is now underway. There have been reports of black cutworm and slug feeding in a number of fields as a result of delayed crop planting and emergence and cool, wet weather conditions. There have also been reports of corn turning purple or white as a result of stress but those fields are expected to grow out of this.

OMAFRA Field Crop staff began tracking soil nitrate levels at a number of sites across the province the first week of May. Initial results suggest that soil nitrate levels are lower this year compared to previous years. Conventional PSNT timing sampling is being completed this week. Results will be posted at Weathercentral.ca under “Corn – GFO Nitrogen Research” as they are made available.

Soybeans
Soybean planting is 80 per cent completed across the province with some areas further behind compared to previous years due to significant rainfall this spring. The crop ranges from the hook stage to unifoliate growth stage. There continues to be weed challenges in a number of fields that did not receive a pre-plant burndown. Weed control during the early stages of soybean growth is critical. When making herbicide spray decisions pay attention to the growth stage of the weed as well as the growth stage of the soybeans.

There have been damage reports and replants particularly in Lambton, Essex, Niagara and Haldimand counties where they have received large amounts of rainfall and crusting became an issue. When doing plant population assessments a stand with 100,000 uniform plants per acre should not be considered for replanting. Research has shown that 100,000 plants per acre has a 98 per cent yield potential on most soil types.

On heavy clay soils 110,000-120,000 plants per acre are necessary for maximum yield potential. Rolling fields after the soybeans have fully emerged compared to rolling immediately after seeding helps alleviate stand losses due to crusting. Rolling can be up done up to the 1st trifoliate stage. There have been reports of seed corn maggot feeding in a number of regions due to the cool, wet weather. Fields planted without Class 12 insecticides that have sufficient stand loss due to certain soil insects including seedcorn maggot may warrant the completion of Inspection of Crop Pest Assessment by a professional pest advisor. If stand loss thresholds for the Class 12 regulations are reached, Class 12 insecticides can be purchased for that farm property. Contact a Professional Pest Advisor and refer here for more information. Bean leaf beetle feeding has also been reported in Essex County. Fields planted with fungicide-only seed should be scouted during the early seedling stages. Spray is warranted if 16 adult beetles per 30 cm of row are found on VC to V2 stage soybeans. If plants are clipped off at the stem, control is warranted if adults are still present and actively feeding.

Forages
First-cut alfalfa has begun in many areas with excellent yields being reported to date. Growers who applied some early season N to forage stands are reporting significant yield boosts. Alfalfa weevil and potato leafhoppers have been present in some areas. 

Canola
Canola emergence has been good to date; however, crop advancement has been slow particularly in northern Ontario. The earliest planted fields are at the 4 leaf stage. Growers in the Timiskaming area are already catching swede midge at this time and are likely going to have to spray sooner than anticipated. Swede midge has also been caught in the Shelburne area but has not yet reached thresholds. Due to the later planted crop and swede midge emergence this year it is anticipated that swede midge feeding will be a significant challenge. There have also been reports of high flea beetle pressure in some fields. 

Edible Beans
Due to the excessive moisture in many areas, edible bean planting is approximately 15 per cent complete. It is expected that the remaining acres will be planted later this week once conditions dry up.
Like many of you, I spent the winter months attending as many conferences and trade shows as possible, soaking up all the new ideas and proven best practices offered up by industry leaders. I also had the privilege of speaking with many of you about the challenges your farms are facing and the tools and strategies you hope to apply to overcome those challenges in the years ahead.
Flooding, pests, disease and other extreme weather events are constant risks to the businesses and livelihoods of farmers. So, parliament has announced a $786,921 investment for Farm Management Canada to develop a new online agricultural risk management tool called "AgriShield". This online tool will help farmers have real-time assessments of the potential negative impact of risks to their businesses and provide mitigation solutions. For example, if an overland flood situation is imminent, the tool can help farmers to assess the degree of risk they face and potential mitigation measures that they can adopt, such as tile draining or insurance coverage.

This investment is being made through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's AgriRisk Initiatives, which supports the research and development, as well as the implementation and administration of new risk management tools for use in the agriculture sector.
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