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CPR to find grain handlers for sloppy loading

Grain handling companies who spill grain on the end of sills of rail hopper cars may face fines from the Canadian Pacific Railway. Fines are part of an initiative to avoid attracting wildlife along CPR's track network.


June 2, 2008
By canadiancattlemen.ca

May
30, 2008

As part of a wildlife protection
initiative, Canadian Pacific Railway plans to fine grain handling companies who
spill grain on the end sills of rail hopper cars during loading.

The railway announced Friday that
starting July 7, customers who identify and clean up spilled grain on the end
sills of cars will benefit from an "incentive-based" tariff, while
those who don't clean up get "punitive charges."

Mindful of spilled grain attracting
wildlife along CPR's track network, CPR announced it would take "further
steps" to clean the exterior end sills of 3,000 grain hopper cars,
increasing the use of its grain vacuum trucks.

More than 2,000 cars have been
cleaned to date, CPR said, with the remainder of the cleaning planned in
Calgary, Saskatoon and Moose Jaw between now and September. CPR said
it will spend $125,000 to complete the work.

CPR CEO Fred Green said the new program
shows the company's respect for the needs of communities, including the national
parks through which CPR trains travel.

The cleaning program will include a
communications plan, endorsed by Parks Canada, aimed at educating customers
about the benefits to the environment and wildlife protection, the company
said.

Viterra, the grain company
responsible for up to 45 per cent of
Canada's grain shipments, said in CPR's
release that it supports CPR's car-cleaning initiative.

"This is a meaningful action
that will help protect these magnificent animals and
Banff National Park for future generations," said
Ron Hallman, executive director of mountain parks for Parks Canada, also in
CPR's release. "Parks Canada welcomes Canadian Pacific's initiative in
working to reduce the presence of animal attractants such as grain along their
tracks."

 


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